Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBell, Caroline J
dc.contributor.authorFoulds, James A
dc.contributor.authorHorwood, L John
dc.contributor.authorMulder, Roger T
dc.date.available2020-09-11T00:33:19Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier0007-1250 1472-1465
dc.identifier.citationBell, C. J., Foulds, J. A., Horwood, L. J., Mulder, R. T., & Boden, J. M. (2018). Childhood abuse and psychotic experiences in adulthood: findings from a 35-year longitudinal study. British Journal of Psychiatry. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1192/bjp.2018.264
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10284
dc.description.abstractBackground The extent to which exposure to childhood sexual and physical abuse increases the risk of psychotic experiences in adulthood is currently unclear.Aims To examine the relationship between childhood sexual and physical abuse and psychotic experiences in adulthood taking into account potential confounding and time-dynamic covariate factors.Method Data were from a cohort of 1265 participants studied from birth to 35 years. At ages 18 and 21, cohort members were questioned about childhood sexual and physical abuse. At ages 30 and 35, they were questioned about psychotic experiences (symptoms of abnormal thought and perception). Generalised estimating equation models investigated covariation of the association between abuse exposure and psychotic experiences including potential confounding factors in childhood (socioeconomic disadvantage, adverse family functioning) and time-dynamic covariate factors (mental health, substance use and life stress).Results Data were available for 962 participants; 6.3% had been exposed to severe sexual abuse and 6.4% to severe physical abuse in childhood. After adjustment for confounding and time-dynamic covariate factors, those exposed to severe sexual abuse had rates of abnormal thought and abnormal perception symptoms that were 2.25 and 4.08 times higher, respectively than the 'no exposure' group. There were no significant associations between exposure to severe physical abuse and psychotic experiences.Conclusions Findings indicate that exposure to severe childhood sexual (but not physical) abuse is independently associated with an increased risk of psychotic experiences in adulthood (particularly symptoms of abnormal perception) and this association could not be fully accounted for by confounding or time-dynamic covariate factors.Declaration of interest None.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists
dc.relation.ispartofThe British Journal of Psychiatry
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.2018.264
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleChildhood abuse and psychotic experiences in adulthood: Findings from a 35-year longitudinal study
dc.typeJournal Article
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago, Christchurch School of Medicine and Health Sciences
otago.relation.issue3
otago.relation.volume214
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.2018.264
otago.bitstream.endpage158
otago.bitstream.startpage153
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.rights.statementThis version in OUR Archive is the author's manuscript accepted for publication after peer-review. The published version is: Bell, C. J., Foulds, J. A., Horwood, L. J., Mulder, R. T., & Boden, J. M. (2018). Childhood abuse and psychotic experiences in adulthood: findings from a 35-year longitudinal study. British Journal of Psychiatry. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1192/bjp.2018.264
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as CC BY-NC-ND 4.0