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dc.contributor.authorFriesen, Myron D.
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Lianne J.
dc.contributor.authorHorwood, L. John
dc.contributor.authorFergusson, David M.
dc.date.available2020-09-11T00:33:25Z
dc.date.copyright2010
dc.identifier0033-2917 1469-8978
dc.identifier.citationFriesen, M. D., Woodward, L. J., Horwood, L. J., & Fergusson, D. M. (2010). Childhood exposure to sexual abuse and partnership outcomes at age 30. Psychological Medicine, 40, 679-688. doi: 10.1017/S0033291709990389
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10307
dc.description.abstractBackground: In this study, 30-year longitudinal data from the Christchurch Health and Development Study (CHDS) were used to examine the associations between childhood exposure to sexual abuse and intimate relationship outcomes at age 30. In addition, a broad range of early childhood and family confounding factors were tested, and the role of intervening factors from adolescence was explored.Method The investigation analyzed data from a birth cohort of over 900 New Zealand adults studied to the age of 30. At ages 18 and 21 cohort members reported on any exposure to sexual abuse prior to age 16. This information, along with prospective data gathered in childhood and adolescence, was used to predict partnership outcomes at age 30.Results After adjustment for early childhood and family factors, exposure to more severe forms of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) was associated with earlier and more frequent cohabitation, higher rates of perpetrated interpartner violence (IPV), and early parenthood, lower relationship satisfaction and investment. Several factors from adolescence partially or fully mediated these associations, notably a history of early consensual sexual intercourse, higher number of sexual partnerships, substance abuse problems, and self-esteem. After adjustment for intervening factors, exposure to CSA remained significantly associated with IPV.Conclusions The findings support a causal chain process, whereby early childhood and family factors place some individuals at risk for CSA. The extent of CSA exposure is related to adolescent risk taking, which in turn leads to early and more frequent cohabitation, risk of IPV, and lower relationship satisfaction and investment.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicine
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291709990389
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleChildhood exposure to sexual abuse and partnership outcomes at age 30
dc.typeJournal Article
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago, Christchurch School of Medicine and Health Sciences
otago.relation.issue4
otago.relation.volume40
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291709990389
otago.bitstream.endpage688
otago.bitstream.startpage679
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.rights.statementThis version in OUR Archive is the author's manuscript accepted for publication after peer-review. The published version is: Friesen, M. D., Woodward, L. J., Horwood, L. J., & Fergusson, D. M. (2010). Childhood exposure to sexual abuse and partnership outcomes at age 30. Psychological Medicine, 40, 679-688. doi: 10.1017/S0033291709990389
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CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as CC BY-NC-ND 4.0