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dc.contributor.authorRaudino, Alessandra
dc.contributor.authorFergusson, David M.
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Lianne J.
dc.contributor.authorHorwood, L. John
dc.date.available2020-09-11T00:33:30Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier0933-7954 1433-9285
dc.identifier.citationRaudino, A., Fergusson, D. M., Woodward, L. J., & Horwood, L. J. (2013). The intergenerational transmission of conduct problems. Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, 48(3), 465-476. doi: 10.1007/s00127-012-0547-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10329
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Drawing on prospective longitudinal data, this paper examines the intergenerational transmission of childhood conduct problems in a sample of 209 parents and their 331 biological offspring studied as part of the Christchurch Health and Developmental Study. The aims were to estimate the association between parental and offspring conduct problems and to examine the extent to which this association could be explained by (a) confounding social/family factors from the parent's childhood and (b) intervening factors reflecting parental behaviours and family functioning. Methods: The same item set was used to assess childhood conduct problems in parents and offspring. Two approaches to data analysis (generalised estimating equation regression methods and latent variable structural equation modelling) were used to examine possible explanations of the intergenerational continuity in behaviour. Results: Regression analysis suggested that there was moderate intergenerational continuity (r = 0.23, p < 0.001) between parental and offspring conduct problems. This continuity was not explained by confounding factors but was partially mediated by parenting behaviours, particularly parental over-reactivity. Latent variable modelling designed to take account of non-observed common genetic and environmental factors underlying the continuities in problem behaviours across generations also suggested that parenting behaviour played a role in mediating the intergenerational transmission of conduct problems. Conclusions: There is clear evidence of intergenerational continuity in conduct problems. In part this association reflects a causal chain process in which parental conduct problems are associated (directly or indirectly) with impaired parenting behaviours that in turn influence risks of conduct problems in offspring.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-012-0547-0
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleThe intergenerational transmission of conduct problems
dc.typeJournal Article
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago, Christchurch School of Medicine and Health Sciences
otago.relation.issue3
otago.relation.volume48
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-012-0547-0
otago.bitstream.endpage476
otago.bitstream.startpage465
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.rights.statementThis version in OUR Archive is the author's manuscript accepted for publication after peer-review. The published version is: Raudino, A., Fergusson, D. M., Woodward, L. J., & Horwood, L. J. (2013). The intergenerational transmission of conduct problems. Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, 48(3), 465-476. doi: 10.1007/s00127-012-0547-0
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CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as CC BY-NC-ND 4.0