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dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Matthew R Ven_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDevlin, Nancy Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Paulen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:06:12Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationPerkins, M. R. V., Devlin, N. J., & Hansen, P. (2001). Māori health state preferences: a pilot study (Economics Discussion Papers Series No. 101). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1037en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1037
dc.descriptionForthcoming (2003 or 2004) as: "The validity and reliability of EQ-5D health state valuations in a survey of Māori", Quality of Life Research.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractObjective: To pilot research of potential differences between Māori and non-Māori in their health state preferences and to investigate the adequacy of a standard valuation instrument’s — the EQ-5D’s — representation of ‘health’. Methods: Health state valuations and perceptions of the EQ-5D’s adequacy were collected in 2000 via a self-completed but interviewer-assisted questionnaire from 66 Māori in New Zealand accessed through cultural networks; five participants also undertook in-depth post-questionnaire interviews. Their valuations and perceptions were compared with non-Māori and Māori respectively from an earlier survey that used an electoral roll sampling frame. Results: The valuations were not statistically different to valuations from the non-Māori and Māori electoral roll samples, although the majority of respondents failed to score the health ‘state’ dead. Participants exhibited more pairwise inconsistencies than their electoral roll counterparts and most considered the EQ-5D’s representation of ‘health’ to be adequate, although other aspects not included in the instrument were also important. Conclusions: The hypothesis of differences between Māori and non-Māori in their health state preferences is not supported. Nor is there evidence that the EQ-5D fails to capture what Māori perceive as ‘health’ any more than it does for non-Māori, although the high prevalence of missing values for dead is worrisome. Implications: These tentative findings suggest no fundamental rationale for differentiating between Māori and non-Māori when using the EQ-5D to represent (generic) health outcomes or to value them for economic evaluations.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEconomics Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.business.otago.ac.nz/econ/research/discussionpapers/index.htmlen_NZ
dc.subjecthealth state preferencesen_NZ
dc.subjectnon-Maorien_NZ
dc.subjectEQ-5D’sen_NZ
dc.subjecthealth outcomesen_NZ
dc.subjectMāorien_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF Commerceen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF5601 Accountingen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHB Economic Theoryen_NZ
dc.titleMāori health state preferences: a pilot studyen_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages18en_NZ
otago.date.accession2007-04-13en_NZ
otago.schoolEconomicsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints637en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsEconomicsen_NZ
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otago.relation.number101en_NZ
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