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dc.contributor.advisorJackson, Richard
dc.contributor.advisorStandish, Katerina
dc.contributor.authorTalahma, Rula Yousef Atallah
dc.date.available2020-10-13T21:59:57Z
dc.date.copyright2020
dc.identifier.citationTalahma, R. Y. A. (2020). Bioplanning: Practices of governing and resistance. A Foucaultian analytic of planning and resistance to planning practices in the occupied Palestinian West Bank following the peace process (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/10445en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10445
dc.description.abstractOver the last twenty-five years of the Oslo era, Israel continued its interventionist colonialism that led to nearly irreversible political, economic, and cultural transformations within Palestinian society in the West Bank. The temporary peace agreement has become permanent, and is considered by experts on the Palestinian cause to be the most recent episode of foreign powers functioning within the limited space of the West Bank, leading to the exhaustion of Palestinians as the powers’ means of exercise. While Israel’s methods of land seizures and control of natural resources have been examined, the town planning discourse has not been sufficiently deployed as a means to understand the process of subjugation and resistance. The main question this research raises is how the antecedent powers used town planning propositions, laws, and institutions to control issues of life and death, leading to Israel becoming a biopower in the West Bank, which, supported by the Palestinian Authority’s self-proclaimed sovereignty over isolated Palestinian localities, constitutes a system of governmentality. Based on the work of Michel Foucault, the problematisation of the present era must be placed within a historical framework. Hence, this project combines poststructuralist planning theory and Foucault’s modern power theory to provide a theoretical framework with which to analyse planning discourse as a form of governmentality. Through accessing archival data and utilising Foucault’s genealogy as the primary tool of investigation, the research concludes with presenting the nature of power and resistance, and how these shape the present subject.1 1 The researcher uses the term ‘subject’ to refer to individuals and groups shaped by power and resistance.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectPalestine
dc.subjectWest Bank
dc.subjectTown Planning
dc.subjectPower Analytic
dc.subjectResistance
dc.subjectSubjugation
dc.subjectBiopower
dc.subjectGovernmentality
dc.subjectGenealogy
dc.subjectPeace
dc.subjectMichel Foucault
dc.titleBioplanning: Practices of governing and resistance. A Foucaultian analytic of planning and resistance to planning practices in the occupied Palestinian West Bank following the peace process
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2020-10-13T07:51:46Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineNational Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
otago.evidence.presentYes
otago.abstractonly.term26w
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