Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCotter, Jim
dc.contributor.advisorThomas, Kate
dc.contributor.advisorAkerman, Ashley
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Benjamin
dc.date.available2020-10-28T23:39:14Z
dc.date.copyright2020
dc.identifier.citationSmith, B. (2020). Determining the role of exercise-induced heat in resistance exercise conditioning (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/10475en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10475
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Exercise is known to increase body temperature, but the temperature of exercising muscle is under-examined, particularly in resistance exercise. Muscle temperature is of interest because muscle heating per se can promote hypertrophy and protect against atrophy. The aims of this project were to: (i) characterise muscle temperature responses to typical resistance exercise training regimes, (ii) investigate the feasibility of preventing the muscle temperature rise, and (iii) determine the extent to which exercise-induced heat underpins adaptations from resistance training. The hypotheses were that: i) high repetition, short-rest exercise would be the most thermogenic exercise regimen, and (ii) resistance training with prevention of exercise-induced rises in muscle temperature from the active muscle would attenuate hypertrophic and strength adaptation, when compared to matched training with exercise-induced heat accumulation. Methods: Two studies were completed. In Study 1, five physically-active participants (two females) undertook three work-matched resistance exercise sessions in randomised order, on separate days. Unilateral bicep curls were used in sessions representing hypertrophy training (3x10 repetitions at 67% 1RM), strength-endurance training (3x20 repetitions at 34% 1RM), and strength training (6x4 repetitions at 84% 1RM). Thereafter, the feasibility of preventing muscle temperature rise during a strength session was assessed using arm immersion in 14°C water for 10 minutes preceding the first exercise set and between each remaining set. Study 2 was a preliminary study on the effects of muscle temperature on adaptations to resistance exercise. Five healthy non-resistance trained participants (three females) completed a 6-week bicep curl resistance training programme using a contralateral limb-control design. Eighteen strength training sessions (6x4 repetitions at ~80% 1RM) were completed with one arm randomised to train in a cool state (“cool”, as described above) and the other arm training with natural heat accumulation (“warm”). Results: Study 1: The three regimes increased biceps brachii temperature to a similar extent; 2.0±0.8°C for hypertrophy, 2.5±1.0°C for strength-endurance, and 2.2±0.5°C for strength training (baseline: 35.3±0.8°C; time: p<0.001; condition: p=0.489; interaction: p=0.609). The first third of the exercise session accounted for 46±18%, 62±13% and 60±9% of the total muscle temperature rise for hypertrophy, strength-endurance and strength regimes, respectively (condition: p=0.147). Almost half (44±23%) of the muscle temperature increase was still evident after 15-min recovery, with no effect of condition (condition: p=0.649). Resistance exercise with cooling prevented muscle temperature exceeding its baseline (35.7±0.9°C; post- exercise: 34.6±1.2°C; p=0.164). Study 2: Peak isometric torque increased in both arms, with no effect of condition (warm: 11±11%; cool 4±7%; time: p=0.033; condition: p=0.310). Bicep curl 1RM increased similarly for both conditions (warm: 25±11%; cool 26±11%; time: p<0.001; condition: p=0.891). Trivial changes were observed in arm composition. Cool training attenuated increases in peak twitch amplitude, when assessed in a normothermic state in temperate conditions (warm: 38±26%; cool 2±7%; time: p=0.011; condition: p=0.016). Conclusion: All three regimes of resistance exercise increased biceps brachii temperature substantially and for a prolonged period. Immersion cooling effectively prevented any such increase. Preventing exercise-induced elevation in muscle temperature did not attenuate functional or structural adaptations to strength training, thereby indicating that muscle temperature lacks a role or is redundant in strength adaptations, although this remains to be determined in a larger population.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectResistance Exercise
dc.subjectMuscle Temperature
dc.subjectExercise-induced Heat
dc.titleDetermining the role of exercise-induced heat in resistance exercise conditioning
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2020-10-28T22:59:56Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool of Physical Education, Sports and Exercise Sciences
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
otago.evidence.presentYes
otago.abstractonly.term26w
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record