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dc.contributor.advisorPeddie, Meredith
dc.contributor.authorWright, Maria Lauren
dc.date.available2021-02-08T20:08:12Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.citationWright, M. L. (2021). Associations Between Physical Activity and Fruit and Vegetable consumption in Female Adolescents in New Zealand (Thesis, Master of Dietetics). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/10661en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10661
dc.description.abstractBackground: Inadequate physical activity and low fruit and vegetable consumption are arguably the greatest modifiable risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases in adolescents. Physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable consumption have been reported previously in this age group, however, the associations between these two health behaviours together has not been heavily researched. Understanding the relationship between these two crucial risk factors is likely to support the development of future public health messages. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the relationship between physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption among adolescent females of the SuNDiAL project. Design: Adolescent females aged 15-18 y were recruited from high schools in 8 regions around New Zealand (NZ). Hip-worn Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers and self-report wear-time diaries were used for seven consecutive days to measure moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Fruit and Vegetable consumption was measured using a dietary habits questionnaire. Results: Participants performed an average of 43 minutes/day in MVPA, and more than 75% of females failed to meet physical activity guidelines of ≥60 min of MVPA per day. Fruit and vegetable consumption were generally low, with only 27% of females consuming ≥5 serves per day. Physically active females were 4.7 (95%CI: 1.7 to 13.1, p=0.0024) and 2.7 (95%CI: 1.1 to 6.6, p=0.0302) times more likely to meet fruit and total fruit and vegetable intakes respectively, than inactive females. Conclusion: Physical activity and fruit and vegetable intakes are both insufficient in adolescent females. Girls who were more physically active were also more likely to meet the fruit and vegetable guidelines. It is possible that the facilitators and inhibiting factors associated with meeting both the physical activity and fruit and vegetable guidelines are similar. Further research in this area is clearly needed before targeted public health interventions can be developed or implemented.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectFruit
dc.subjectvegetables
dc.subjectadolescents
dc.subjectphysical activity
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectAdolescent females
dc.subjectnutrition
dc.subjectmoderate to vigorous physical activity
dc.subjectguidelines
dc.titleAssociations Between Physical Activity and Fruit and Vegetable consumption in Female Adolescents in New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2021-02-05T07:16:23Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Nutrition
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Dietetics
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
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