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dc.contributor.authorMcIntosh, Averil Dulcie
dc.date.available2021-02-11T22:13:32Z
dc.date.copyright1961
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10690
dc.description.abstractAs interest in the virgin Pacific Islands grew in the 1860s, it was inevitable that those New Zealanders closely involved in the peculiar difficulties of cotton plantations should see the recruitment of labour with the cold eye of necessity. Their narrow-minded countrymen loved to be shocked by the moving reports of Melanesian missionaries regarding traffic in human souls. Theses said, “We know of causes, induced… enticed… secured… seized…detained…” (Report of the Melanesian Mission, 1870, pp.3&4); and New Zealand men and vessels did not escape the well-founded condemnation. On an official level, the Britain of the South did not recognize such practices and endeavoured to impress its integrity upon the Colonial Office. It is within the scope of this essay to examine the nature, extent and purpose of any New Zealand participation, and where possible to assess the immediate and potential importance of that participation. [Extract from Introduction]en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.titleNew Zealand interest and participation in the Labour traffic prior to Bishop Patteson's death, 21 September 1871en_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
dc.date.updated2021-02-11T21:40:19Z
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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