Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorScarf, Damian
dc.contributor.authorBoden, Hannah
dc.date.available2021-03-07T20:45:07Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.citationBoden, H. (2021). The benefits of belonging: National belonging as a resource for mental health and a potential buffer against the effects of ostracism for young and older adults (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/10740en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10740
dc.description.abstractPeople develop strong emotional connections with the places they inhabit, similar to the connections formed between caregivers and infants. Moreover, as we get older, places come to form part of our identity. Taking a social identity approach, the current thesis investigates the relationship between national belonging and well-being. In Study 1, data from the New Zealand General Social Survey was utilised to investigate the relationship between a sense of belonging to New Zealand and mental well-being. Consistent with Hypothesis 1, a sense of belonging to New Zealand was positively associated with mental health. Further, consistent with Hypothesis 2, the positive relationship observed between a sense of belonging to New Zealand and mental health was stronger for older adults than young adults. Building on Study 1, in Study 2 we investigated whether the benefits of a sense of belonging to New Zealand could be leveraged to protect against the negative impact of ostracism. Specifically, young and older adults were primed with belonging to New Zealand or a control location before being ostracised. It was hypothesised that participants primed with New Zealand, relative to those primed with a control location, would be buffered against the negative impact of ostracism. Additionally, it was hypothesised that this buffering effect would be stronger for older, compared to younger, adults. Neither hypothesis was supported. Priming participants with a sense of belonging to New Zealand did not buffer younger or older adults against the negative effects of ostracism. We discuss our findings in the context of research on the social identity approach and the ostracism literature more generally.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectBelonging
dc.subjectAge
dc.subjectOstracism
dc.subjectCyberball
dc.titleThe benefits of belonging: National belonging as a resource for mental health and a potential buffer against the effects of ostracism for young and older adults
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2021-03-06T02:48:23Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
otago.evidence.presentYes
otago.abstractonly.term363d*
 Find in your library

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item is not available in full-text via OUR Archive.

If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record