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dc.contributor.authorClarkson, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorMirosa, Miranda
dc.contributor.authorBirch, John
dc.date.available2021-03-19T01:58:32Z
dc.date.copyright2018-12
dc.identifier.citationClarkson, C., Mirosa, M., & Birch, J. (2018). Consumer acceptance of insects and ideal product attributes. British Food Journal, 120(12), 2898–2911. doi:https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-11-2017-0645en
dc.identifier.issn0007-070X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10792
dc.description.abstractInsects can be sustainably produced and are nutrient rich. However, adoption of insects in western culture, including New Zealand (NZ) is slow. The purpose of this paper is to explore consumer attitudes, drivers and barriers towards entomophagy and uncover consumer expectations surrounding what their ideal insect product attributes are. In total, 32 participants took part in three product design workshops. This involved two sections. First, focus groups discussion took place surrounding consumer acceptance. Second, following adapted consumer idealised design, groups of three or four designed their ideal liquid and solid product incorporating extracted insect protein. Designs included the ideal product, place, price and promotional attributes. Participants were both disgusted and intrigued about entomophagy, with common barriers including; culture, food neophobia, disgust sensitivity, lack of necessity and knowledge. Motivational drivers were novelty, health, sustainability and/or nutrition. Most of the liquid and solid food products were designed as a premium priced sweet snack, drink or breakfast option, as opposed to a meat substitute. The convenience, health and sustainability benefits of certain products were promoted towards health and fitness oriented consumers. Whereas, other designs promoted the novelty of insects to kids or the general population, in order to introduce the idea of entomophagy to consumers. The study is the first attempt at uncovering what insect products NZ consumers are accepting of; therefore, contributing to both limited research and product development opportunities for industry.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherEmerald Insighten_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Food Journalen_NZ
dc.subjectProduct attributesen_NZ
dc.subjectMarketing mixen_NZ
dc.subjectConsumer acceptanceen_NZ
dc.subjectEntomophagyen_NZ
dc.subjectConsumer idealised designen_NZ
dc.subjectInsect proteinen_NZ
dc.titleConsumer acceptance of insects and ideal product attributesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2021-03-16T22:49:27Z
otago.schoolDepartment of Food Scienceen_NZ
otago.relation.issue12en_NZ
otago.relation.volume120en_NZ
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-11-2017-0645en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage2911en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage2898en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.rights.statementhttps://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-11-2017-0645en_NZ
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