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dc.contributor.authorPurvis, Martinen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCranefield, Stephenen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNowostawski, Mariuszen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Danielen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:06:29Z
dc.date.copyright2002-03en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationPurvis, M., Cranefield, S., Nowostawski, M., & Carter, D. (2002). Opal: A multi-level infrastructure for agent-oriented software development (Information Science Discussion Papers Series No. 2002/01). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1089en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1089
dc.description.abstractThe Opal architecture for software development is described that supports the use of agent-oriented concepts at multiple levels of abstraction. At the lowest level are micro-agents, streamlined agents that can be used for conventional, system-level programming tasks. More sophisticated agents may be constructed by assembling combinations of micro-agents. The architecture consequently supports the systematic use of agent-based notions throughout the software development process. The paper describes (a) the implementation of micro-agents in Java, (b) how they have been used to fashion the Opal framework for the construction of more complex agents based on the Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA) specifications, and (c) the Opal Conversation Manager that facilitates the capability of agents to conduct complex conversations with other agents.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInformation Science Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA76 Computer softwareen_NZ
dc.titleOpal: A multi-level infrastructure for agent-oriented software developmenten_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages27en_NZ
otago.date.accession2010-10-19 20:21:49en_NZ
otago.schoolInformation Scienceen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints944en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsSoftware Engineering & Collaborative Modelling Laboratoryen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInformation Scienceen_NZ
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otago.relation.number2002/01en_NZ
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