Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHall, Jon
dc.contributor.authorBroome, Tyler
dc.date.available2021-05-03T21:15:52Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/10917
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the form and function of prosopopoeia in Cicero’s speeches. Prosopopoeia – the rhetorical device in which an orator fabricates and delivers a discourse as another character – offers an alternative to the orator’s own speech for the communication of information and emotion. The most recent study on the device, D.S. Mayfield’s Variants of Rhetorical Ventriloquism, suggests that “it is always significant rhetorically in whose mouth words are being put – at what time, in which context and whose presence, by which means, and (above all) in the interest of what or whom” (Mayfield 2019, 147-148). This study seeks to evaluate Mayfield’s claim in the practice of Ciceronian oratory by examining when Cicero used the device, whom he portrayed, and how the device contributed to his persuasive aims. A preliminary examination of extant rhetorical theory up to and including Quintilian provides context for Cicero’s practice, identifying a range of potential effects the device could enact. Ancient theory also raises several questions about taxonomical distinctions between types of prosopopoeia, which are briefly discussed to further contextualise Cicero’s practice. Following this, eight of Cicero’s speeches are discussed in chronological order: Pro Quinctio; Pro Roscio Amerino; In Verrem 2.5; the First Catilinarian; Pro Caelio; In Pisonem; Pro Plancio; and Pro Milone. Notable prosopopoeiae in these speeches are identified and evaluated in relation to their persuasive effect on the audience, identifying a diverse range of uses for the device such as generating indignation or pity, and the delineation of characters. Particular attention is paid to the significance of the choice of speaking character and to the emotion generated through the change in speaking-situation. I argue that several patterns emerge in Cicero’s use of the device, many of which have a grounding in rhetorical theory. Moreover, I suggest that it is possible to divide Cicero’s use of prosopopoeia into three categories based on the type of speaking character: deceased and abstract individuals, representations of a client, and representations of an opponent. This investigation shows that these categories present different means of delineating characters, and are attuned to achieving different persuasive effects.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectCicero
dc.subjectProsopopoeia
dc.subjectRhetoric
dc.subjectOratory
dc.subjectVentriloquism
dc.subjectPersona fictio
dc.titleProsopopoeia in Ciceronian Oratory
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2021-04-30T05:06:59Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineClassics
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record