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dc.contributor.authorBurrows, Garyen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:09:17Z
dc.date.copyright2005-11en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBurrows, G. (2005, November). Living gallery: Investigating dynamic display of artwork through proximity detection (Dissertation, Postgraduate Diploma in Commerce). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1149en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1149
dc.description.abstractGalleries displaying artwork and artefacts are already taking advantage of technology to give added value to the viewing public. However are such systems suitable or desirable for use in art displays? The purpose of this study was to create a proximity activated multimedia system to evaluate viewer reactions and opinions to determine if such systems are a beneficial, enjoyable and even an appropriate way to display art. Multimedia used in galleries provides content that predominately follows set patterns and disregards the viewer. Some systems have been developed to alter visual displays depending on viewer location but they require the viewer’s conscious participation through carrying or wearing some form of hardware. We have created a system that reacts to the user without the need to carry any device and reacts to the user in a ubiquitous manner. This allowed us to evaluate the usability and suitability of such systems in the context of viewing art. The displayed content of the system projected onto the wall alters based on the location of the viewer who would not initially know that they have triggered the change in the display themselves. We tested viewer reaction to the system via observation and questionnaires to determine if our hypotheses that such systems are an intuitive, beneficial and enjoyable to gallery patrons is true. The hypothesis that such displays are desirable and useful in a gallery environment is supported by the results gathered from experiments. The results of the hypothesis that such systems if delivered in a ubiquitous manner are intuitive to use by patrons is rejected however.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subject.lcshT Technology (General)en_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA76 Computer softwareen_NZ
dc.titleLiving gallery: Investigating dynamic display of artwork through proximity detectionen_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages86en_NZ
otago.date.accession2005-12-02en_NZ
otago.schoolInformation Scienceen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineInformation Scienceen_NZ
thesis.degree.namePostgraduate Diploma in Commerce
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelPostgraduate Diploma Dissertationsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.eprints35en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInformation Scienceen_NZ
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