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dc.contributor.authorHannagan, Jacquien_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:09:55Z
dc.date.copyright2007-11-14en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHannagan, J. (2007, November 14). TwistMouse for simultaneous translation and rotation (Dissertation, Bachelor of Commerce with Honours). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1176en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1176
dc.description.abstractA common task in many computer applications is positioning objects on the screen. In real life one would simply move the object on the two dimensional plane in one seamless motion translating and rotating simultaneously. These actions must be performed separately with a standard computer mouse when positioning two dimensional (2D) objects. In the forty years since the first computer mouse was invented several alternative input devices have been produced and evaluated. Most have been developed for a specific domain and studies have consistently shown a standard mouse is still preferred for pointing performance. This study proposes a mouse input device, the TwistMouse, with three degrees of freedom: horizontal (x), vertical (y) and rotational (z) on a two dimensional plane which can be used to simultaneously translate and rotate for improved efficiency, effectiveness and user satisfaction in object positioning tasks on screen. In all other respects it acts like a standard contemporary computer mouse. This report presents a methodology for evaluating such a device with a task adapted from real world business applications. The positioning mode of the TwistMouse, a standard mouse and a mouse which is set up to use the wheel for rotation are assessed using a single prototype device. One mode performed significantly better than the others in this study; but it was the wheel mouse mode and not the TwistMouse mode as hypothesised.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subject.lcshQA75 Electronic computers. Computer scienceen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA76 Computer softwareen_NZ
dc.titleTwistMouse for simultaneous translation and rotationen_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages119en_NZ
otago.date.accession2008-02-19en_NZ
otago.schoolInformation Scienceen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineInformation Scienceen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Commerce with Honours
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelHonours Dissertationsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.eprints737en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsMultimedia Systems Research Laboratoryen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInformation Scienceen_NZ
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