Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKuch, Peter
dc.contributor.advisorLittle, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorCarey-Clark, Orion
dc.date.available2021-05-19T23:00:55Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.citationCarey-Clark, O. (2021). Violence in the Theatre of Martin McDonagh (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/11918en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/11918
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates two violent plays by the London-born playwright Martin McDonagh, The Lieutenant of Inishmore and A Very, Very, Very Dark Matter. Considering these texts from a post-colonial and phenomenological perspective, this thesis investigates how violence operates within each text. Chapter One opens by establishing the playwright’s attitude towards theatre. The thesis then defines working parameters for post-colonial theatre, presence, phenomenology and violence. A literature review is then undertaken to outline the current field on the playwright. Drawing on the breadth of scholarly research already established, Chapter Two examines violence in McDonagh’s 2001 play The Lieutenant of Inishmore. This chapter reveals the farcical structure which contains the play’s violence. Using this, the thesis considers how this alters the representation of the characters committing the violence. Chapter Two considers the justification of violence within the colonial context of the play and the phenomenological aspects which illuminate different aspects of violence within the text. Chapter Three approaches McDonagh’s 2018 play A Very, Very, Very Dark Matter from a similar angle and investigates the justification of violence, its colonial context and nineteenth century Dickensian sentimentality. Because of the sparse academic research on this play, this thesis compares and extends ideas using the conclusions reached in Chapter Two. Lastly, the fourth chapter draws conclusions about McDonagh’s significant use of dismemberment, the presence of violence within language and unique aspects of theatre to determine how violence is operating in the respective texts. The thesis then proposes an answer to why McDonagh may be choosing to return to a medium he has expressed distaste for
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectIrish
dc.subjectTheatre
dc.subjectMcDonagh
dc.subjectMartin
dc.subjectPostcolonialism
dc.titleViolence in the Theatre of Martin McDonagh
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2021-05-13T23:14:13Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Studies Programme, School of Performing Arts
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record