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dc.contributor.authorSibbald, Alexanderen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMcAlevey, Lynnen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:11:43Z
dc.date.copyright2003en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationSibbald, A., & McAlevey, L. (2003). Examination of economies of scale in credit unions: a New Zealand study. Applied Economics, 35(11), 1255–1264. doi:10.1080/00036840210148012en
dc.identifier.issn0003–6846en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1232
dc.descriptionThe full text of this document is only available from the publisher's website. Please use the related link to access the full text. This version is a preprint.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractRecent government pressure and aspirations within the industry itself to improve financial stability, have seen credit unions pursue economies of scale to achieve this objective. This presented an opportunity to test the validity of this strategy. However, this study is uncommon, as it utilized the credit union population as the unit of analysis, rather than a sample, prevalent in other research. As a consequence this overcomes difficulties associated with multiple testings, and other statistical problems present in some other previous studies. By drawing upon two measures of operational efficiency, viz. operating costs to income and operating costs to total assets, inconclusive evidence of scale economies was found. While clear efficiency improvement occurred in moving from small to medium sized organisations, less compelling was the evidence of economies of scale in larger credit unions. Although the article followed a conventional cross-sectional methodology by examining performance at a moment in time, the study also adopted a longitudinal case study approach, by examining over time the efficiency of a large credit union. Finally, the measure used, inclusion or exclusion of outliers, and the operational efficiency ratio chosen, all effect the outcome, and either showed evidence of economies or diseconomies, of scale.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Economicsen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/(o143bf45xrpiff45hzcxa455)/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,1,11;journal,65,166;linkingpublicationresults,1:101477,1en_NZ
dc.subjectfinancial stabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectcredit union populationen_NZ
dc.subjecteconomies of scaleen_NZ
dc.subjecteconomies or diseconomiesen_NZ
dc.subjectof scaleen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHC Economic History & Conditionsen_NZ
dc.titleExamination of economies of scale in credit unions: a New Zealand studyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.description.versionPublisheden_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-08-14en_NZ
otago.relation.issue11en_NZ
otago.relation.pages1255-1264en_NZ
otago.relation.volume35en_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00036840210148012en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.eprints352en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
otago.school.eprintsEconomicsen_NZ
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