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dc.contributor.advisorTing, Dr Graeme
dc.contributor.advisorHamzah, Dr Siti Zaleha
dc.contributor.advisorTong, Prof Daryl
dc.contributor.authorMohamed Ashri, Mohd Hakimin Bin
dc.date.available2021-11-23T21:48:16Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.citationMohamed Ashri, M. H. B. (2021). Perceived confidence in performing peripheral venipuncture among dental practitioners in New Zealand and Malaysia (Thesis, Doctor of Clinical Dentistry). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/12526en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/12526
dc.description.abstractAims: This research described the perceived confidence in performing peripheral venipuncture among dental practitioners in New Zealand and Malaysia and determined the preferred mode of training in peripheral venipuncture from the dental practitioners' perspective. Introduction: This exploratory cross-sectional correlational, quantitative study involved the participants completing online questionnaires. The study populations were registered dental practitioners holding the current Annual Practicing Certificates during the data collection in 2020 and were either registered with the Dental Council of New Zealand or the Malaysian Dental Council. The data analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 25. Results: The response rates received from eligible dental practitioners in New Zealand and Malaysian represented 4.7% and 4.3% of registered, actively practising dental practitioners for each country, respectively, in 2020. In New Zealand, 44% of dental practitioners reported exposure to peripheral venipuncture as undergraduates, while in Malaysia, it was 45%. 47% of New Zealand dental practitioners reported confidence in performing peripheral venipuncture during routine dental practice and 29% during medical emergencies. In Malaysia, 21% felt confident performing peripheral venipuncture during routine dental practice, while 9% felt confident performing peripheral venipuncture during medical emergencies. In New Zealand, 65% perceived peripheral venipuncture training as essential, while in Malaysia, 81%. Both New Zealand and Malaysian dental practitioners would prefer peripheral venipuncture training through clinical activities, workshops, simulated practice with a mannequin arm, and inclusion in undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum programmes. Conclusion: Peripheral venipuncture is a very commonly performed and essential medical procedure. A competent level of skill in performing peripheral venipuncture is a valuable asset for dental practitioners. The results of this study could be used to inform training programmes in peripheral venipuncture for dental practitioners. It is hoped that these educational resources could be deployed to maintain competence, improve skills and boost confidence in this area of patient care.  
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectMalaysia
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectPeripheral
dc.subjectVenipuncture
dc.subjectConfidence
dc.titlePerceived confidence in performing peripheral venipuncture among dental practitioners in New Zealand and Malaysia
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2021-11-23T20:45:42Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineOral Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Clinical Dentistry
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
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