Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHunter-Ayad, James
dc.contributor.authorJarvie, Scott
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, Glen
dc.contributor.authorDigby, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorOhlemuller, Ralf
dc.contributor.authorRecio, Mariano R.
dc.contributor.authorSeddon, Philip
dc.contributor.editorHale, Rob
dc.date.available2022-01-05T20:59:15Z
dc.date.copyright2021-07-08
dc.identifier.citationHunter-Ayad, J., Jarvie, S., Greaves, G., Digby, A., Ohlemuller, R., Recio, M. R., & Seddon, P. (2021). Novel Conditions in Conservation Translocations: A Conservative-Extrapolative Strategic Framework (Animal behavior after translocation to novel environments No. 1). (R. Hale, Ed.). Frontiers in Conservation Science. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/12647en
dc.identifier.other691714
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/12647
dc.description.abstractIn response to anthropogenic threats, conservation translocations are increasingly used to combat species’ population and range declines. However, moving animals outside of their current distribution can mean introducing them to novel conditions, even in the case of reintroductions to formerly inhabited areas due to ecosystem changes following extirpation. This exposure to novel conditions introduces uncertainty that can undermine decision making for species conservation. Here we propose two strategies, which we define as conservative and extrapolative, for approaching and managing novelty and the resulting uncertainty in conservation translocations. Conservative strategies are characterised by the avoidance and removal of novel conditions as much as possible, whereas extrapolative strategies are more experimental, allowing exposure to novel conditions and monitoring outcomes to increase understanding of a species’ ecology. As each strategy carries specific risks and opportunities, they will be applicable in different scenarios. Extrapolative strategies suit species in recovery which can afford some experimental management, or species facing novel and emerging threats which require less traditional translocations, such as assisted colonisations. We provide examples, applying our framework to two endemic New Zealand species with long histories of translocation management: tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), a reptile and takahe¯ (Porphyrio hochstetteri), a flightless bird.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherFrontiers in Conservation Scienceen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAnimal behavior after translocation to novel environmentsen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcosc.2021.691714/fullen_NZ
dc.subjectTranslocationen_NZ
dc.subjectnoveltyen_NZ
dc.subjectRestorationen_NZ
dc.subjectEcological conservationen_NZ
dc.subjectStratergyen_NZ
dc.subjectWildlife managementen_NZ
dc.subjectevidence-based conservationen_NZ
dc.subjectadaptive managementen_NZ
dc.titleNovel Conditions in Conservation Translocations: A Conservative-Extrapolative Strategic Frameworken_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.date.updated2022-01-05T20:43:18Z
otago.schoolDepartment of Zoologyen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
otago.relation.number1en_NZ
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record