Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPoletti, E Jen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:12:40Z
dc.date.copyright2000-09-27en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationPoletti, E. J. (2000, September 27). ‘The gold in the heads of scientists’: The metaphor of business and the establishment of the Crown Research Institutes (Dissertation, Master of Business). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1291en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1291
dc.description.abstractBusiness and the business world were important sources of metaphors for reform of public sectors during the 1980s. This study examines the way one such metaphor---The Crown Research Institutes are businesses---was deployed during reform of the statefunded science sector in New Zealand and considers the broader consequences for thinking and behaviour inside the organisations. The study focuses on discourses from two key ritual processes, Parliamentary debates and annual reports during the establishment phase of the Crown Research Institutes (CRTs). Using a framework for analysis developed from a wide range of studies on the nature and roles of metaphor, close readings of the selected discourses (debates on the Crown Research Institutes Bill in 1992, and Chairman's reports for the CRIB from 1992 to 1995) were undertaken under the general research question Did the business metaphor provide a constructive framework for the new research organisations? Contrary to initial expectations, the base metaphor was not a significant element in the discourses around the CRTs in Parliament. A surrogate metaphor---the science dividend---emerged as a means of saving the base metaphor in a context where ideas of profit and competition appeared to be unacceptable, but there was bi-partisan support for the general approach to reform. There is some evidence that MPs were not always able to recognise the presence of metaphor. The CRI reports presented a more diffuse picture, but as before, little overt use was made of the base metaphor. Only one CRI developed its own alternate metaphor---This CRI is a professional practice. The remaining eight appeared to undergo a continuing search for appropriate metaphors as a basis for persuading others and providing scenarios for organisational behaviour. It is suggested that the base metaphor has become so ingrained as to be taken literally. The consequences for thinking about the CRIB would seem to be on the one hand that while there is deep unease about the base metaphor, there is generally no other metaphor available as a framework for exploring the problems they pose. Where on the other hand the metaphor is taken literally, misperceptions of appropriate behaviour are possible, with unexpected and undesirable consequences for behaviour, and particularly for the use of accounting information.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectCrown Research Institutes,Research Institutes Bill in 1992en_NZ
dc.subjectChairman's reports for the CRIB from 1992 to 1995 New Zealand,en_NZ
dc.subject.lcshJA Political science (General)en_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHJ Public Financeen_NZ
dc.title“The gold in the heads of scientists”: The metaphor of business and the establishment of the Crown Research Institutesen_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages87en_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-06-08en_NZ
otago.schoolAccountancy and Business Lawen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineAccountancy and Business Lawen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Business
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters Dissertationsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.eprints315en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsAccountancy & Business Lawen_NZ
dc.description.referencesAlbrow, M.: Bureaucracy. London: Macmillan, 1970. Alford, J.: Towards a new public management model: beyond ‘managerialism’ and its critics. Australian Journal of Public Administration 52, 1993, pp. 134--148. Alford, J.: Who said production was simple?: delineating the “public production process”. Australian Journal of Public Administration 55, 4, 1996, pp. 157—163. Ansari, S. & K. J. Euske: Rational, rationalising and reifying uses of accounting data in organisations. Accounting, Organisations and Society 12,6, 1978, pp. 549—570. Aristotle: On the art of poetry. (Tr. T. S. Dorsch). Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1977. Berggren, D.: The use and abuse of metaphor. Review of metaphysics 16,2, Dec. 1962, pp.237—258, & 16,3, March 1963, pp. 450—472. Berry, T., T. Capps, D. Cooper, P. Ferguson, T. Hopper & T. Low: Management control in an area of the National Coal Board. Accounting, Organisations and Society 10, 1985, pp.3—27. Bicchieri, C.: Should a scientist abstain from metaphor? In: The consequences of economic rhetoric. (Eds A. Klamer, D. N. McCloskey & R. M. Solow) Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1988, pp. 100—114. Black, M.: Metaphor. In: Models and Metaphors. Studies in language and philosophy. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1962, pp. 25—47. Black, M.: More about metaphor. In: Metaphor and thought (2nd edition, ed A. Ortony). Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1993, pp. 19—41. Bollard,. A. & D. Harper with M. Theron: Research and development in New Zealand. A policy framework. Wellington: New Zealand Institute of Economic Research, 1987. (= Research Monograph 39) Boston, J., J. Martin, J. Pallot & P. Walsh: Public Management. The New Zealand Model. Auckland, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1996. Crocker, J. C: My brother the parrot. In: The social use of metaphor. Essays in the anthropology of rhetoric. (eds. J. D. Sapir & J. C. Crocker) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977, pp. 164—192. Crocker, J. C.: The social functions of rhetorical forms. In: The social use of metaphor. Essays in the anthropology of rhetoric. (eds. J. D. Sapir & J. C. Crocker) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977, pp. 33—66. Dent, J. F.: Accounting and oragnizational cultures: a field study of the emergence of a new organizational reality. Accounting, organizations and society 16, 8, 1991, pp. 705— 732. Devine, S.: Purchasing scientific research outputs within the new science structures. Public Sector 18, 4, 1995, pp. 6—9. DiMaggio, P. J. & W. W. Powell: The iron cage revisited: institutional isomorphism and collective rationality in organizational fields. In: DiMaggio, P. J. & W. W. Powell (eds): The new institutionalism in organizational analysis. Chicago & London: University of Chicago Press, 1991, pp. 63—82. Erenstrom, K.: Emergent trends in the public sector and the implications for accountability. 1999 Public Sector Convention “Beyond the Millenium”-Capitalising on Success. Wellington: ICANZ, 1999. Fernandez, J. W.: Persuasions and performance: of the beast in every body … and the metaphors of Everyman. Daedalus. Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 101, 1, 1972, pp. 39—60. Fernandez, J. W.: The performance of ritual metaphors. In: The social use of metaphor. Essays in the anthropology of rhetoric. (eds. J. D. Sapir & J. C. Crocker) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977, pp. 100—131. Gregory, R.: The peculiar tasks of public management: towards conceptual discrimination. Australian Journal of Public Administration 54, 1995a, pp 171—183. Gregory, R.: Accountability, responsibility and corruption: managing the “public production process”. In: J. Boston (ed.): The state under contract. Wellington: Bridget Williams Books, 1995b. Hesse, M. B.: Models and analogies in science. Notre Dame: Univesity of Notre Dame Press, 1966. Hood, C.: A public management for all seasons? Public administration 69, 1991, pp. 3--19. Jaynes, J.: The origin of consciousness in the breakdown of the bicameral mind. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1976. Jesson, B.: Only their purpose is mad. The money men take over New Zealand. Palmerston North: Dunmore Press, 1999. Kelsey, Jane: The New Zealand Experiment: a world model for structural adjustment. Auckland: AUP & Bridget Williams Books, 1995. Laking, R.G.: The New Zealand management reforms. Australian Journal of Public Administration 53,3, 1994, pp. 313--324. Lakoff, G. & M Turner: More than cool reason: a field guide to poetic metaphor. Chicago & London: University of Chicago Press, 1989. Mascarenhas, R. C.: Building an enterprise culture in the public sector: reform of the public sector in Australia, Britain and New Zealand. Public Administration Review 53,4, 1993, pp. 319- -328. McCloskey, D. N.: Knowledge and persuasion in economics. Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1994. McCulloch, B. W. & I. Ball: Accounting in the context of public sector reform. Financial Accountability and Management 8,1, 1992, pp. 7--12. McKinley, P.: Crown Entities: a reflection. Public Sector 20, 3, 1997, pp. 2—5. Meyer, J. W. & B. Rowan: Institutionalised organisations: formal structure as myth and ceremony. American Journal of Sociology 83 (2), 1977, pp. 340—363. Miller, E. F.: Metaphor and political knowledge. The American Political Science Review 73, 1979, pp.155—170. Ministry of Research, Science and Technology: Investing in science for our future. A paper presenting the Government’s “Statement of Science Priorities” for the Public Good Science Fund. Wellington: The Ministry, 1992. Morgan, G.: Images of organization. Newbury Park, Cal., London, Delhi: SAGE Publications, 1986. Pallot, J.: Elements of a theoretical framework for public sector accounting. Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal 5, 1992, pp. 38—59. Pearce, A.: Contracting in the science sector: a research provider’s view. Public Sector 18, 4, 1995, pp. 10—15. Pinker, S.: The language instinct. The new science of language and mind. London: Penguin, 1995. Richards, I.: The philosophy of rhetoric. London, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 1965. Ricoeur, P. : The metaphorical process as cognition, imagination and feeling. In: Sacks, S. (ed.): On Metaphor. Chicago, London: University of Chicago Press, 1979, pp. 141— 157. Ricoeur, P.: The rule of metaphor: multi-disciplinary studies in the creation of meaning in language. (Tr. R. Czerny) London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978. Sapir, J. D.: The anatomy of metaphor. In: The social use of metaphor. Essays in the anthropology of rhetoric. (eds. J. D. Sapir & J. C. Crocker) University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977, pp. 3—32. Schachter, H. L. Reinventing government or reinventing ourselves. The role of citizen owners in making a better government. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997. Schick, A.: Budgeting for results: recent developments in five industrialised countries. Public Administration Review 50(1) 1990, pp. 26--34. Schön, D. A.: Generative metaphor: a perspective on problem-setting in social policy. In: Metaphor and thought (ed A. Ortony). Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1979, pp. 254—283. Scott, G. & P. Gorringe: Reform of the core public sector: the New Zealand experience. Australian Journal of Public Administration 48, 1, 1989, pp. 81—91. State Services Commission: Public Service. Principles, Conventions and Practice. SSC: Wellington, 1995. Turbayne, C. M.: The myth of metaphor. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1963. Upton, Rt. Hon. S.: Contracting in the science sector: an overview. Public Sector 18, 4, 1995, pp. 2--5en_NZ
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record