Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFrazer, Ian
dc.contributor.advisorKruse Va' ai, Emma
dc.contributor.advisorSopoaga, Tai
dc.contributor.advisorRich, Peter
dc.contributor.authorPereira, Janet Aileenen_NZ
dc.date.available2009-11-15T19:47:59Z
dc.date.copyright2006
dc.identifierhttp://adt.otago.ac.nz/public/adt-NZDU20061025.141215en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationPereira, J. A. (2006). Aspects of primary education in Samoa : exploring student, parent and teacher perspectives (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/138en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/138
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a qualitative study into aspects of primary education in Samoa. Using student, parent and teacher interview material, I investigate local perspectives on why education is important, what children should learn, how children learn, and what constitutes 'good' teaching. I also look at local perspectives on the place of exams and physical discipline. Fieldwork included classroom observations in rural and urban settings. The thesis documents how children approach learning at school, how teachers go about their work, and how teachers and students interact. This is primarily an ethnographic study and, as such, focuses on local theories and meanings. However, several broader theoretical areas emerge as important. In the thesis I look at: a) the interdependence between different aspects of school (i.e. curriculum, teaching methods, assessment practices, material constraints, etc.); b) the relationship between primary education and the wider society; and c) the increasing impact of globalisation on education. The thesis challenges the belief that patterns of interaction at school undermine primary socialisation. It also challenges the idea that primary education is an alien Western institution. Formal education has been eagerly embraced, co-opted, and reshaped to ensure consistency with local perspectives and practices. Increasingly, global flows impact on education in Samoa. This has created tensions between educational policy and teaching practice. Education policies are profoundly influenced by Western ideologies and practices. These reflect fundamentally different ways of thinking about children, their relationships with adults, teaching, and learning. By contrast, teaching practices in Samoa are consistent with local beliefs, values and understandings, and the material realities of a small, fiscally constrained Pacific nation. Policy initiatives are often met with inertia and resistance. The thesis raises issues as to the role of education in maintaining the status quo versus education as an agent of change. It also points to the increasingly difficulty task of defining what is a relevant education and how this is best achieved.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightshttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.html
dc.subjectSamoaen_NZ
dc.subjectprimary educationen_NZ
dc.subjectteacher-student relationshipsen_NZ
dc.titleAspects of primary education in Samoa : exploring student, parent and teacher perspectivesen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Anthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral Thesesen_NZ
otago.interloanyes
otago.openaccessOpen
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record