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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Philen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWard, Matthewen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:16:21Z
dc.date.copyright2000en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHarris, P., & Ward, M. (2000). Marketing the mayor: political marketing and the Livingstone4London mayoral election campaign. University of Otago.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1458
dc.description.abstractPolitical marketing is commonly regarded as synonymous with the use of persuasive techniques in campaigns to promote both politicians and their policies. The borrowing of professional communication tools, such as advertising and public relations is believed to epitomise the concept of political marketing, as underlined by Kavanagh (1994:8) in his observation, `…parties are like businesses seeking to promote their products: one seeks votes, the other sales`. However, Maarek (1992) suggests that political marketing is a broader concept. Maarek (1992:28) emphasises that political marketing includes evaluation and re-design of policy and electoral strategy in the light of studies of the electorate’s concerns, underlined in his assertion; Political communication no longer means merely designing and printing a message on posters without consideration of whom they are addressed to. It encompasses the entire marketing process, from preliminary market study to testing and targeting. Concentrating on the Livingstone4London mayoral election campaign, this essay will apply the political marketing and public relations literature to features of the campaign. The three sections of the essay will follow the evolutionary models of political marketing outlined by Wring (1996) and other commentators. The first section of the essay will discuss the propaganda model of political communications, applying the concept to the most overt tools used by the Livingstone4London campaign. The second section of the essay will investigate behind the overt marketing tools of the campaign logo in purple colours and matching purple double-decker campaign bus to discuss the features of the campaign relevant to the `…”sales-led”…` model. The third section will analyse the political marketing concept, investigating the changes in policy and electoral strategy of the campaign. The essay will conclude that the Livingstone4London campaign’s wider appreciation of the political marketing concept contributed to its success.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.subjectLivingstone4Londonen_NZ
dc.subjectmayoral electionen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF Commerceen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF5601 Accountingen_NZ
dc.titleMarketing the mayor: political marketing and the Livingstone4London mayoral election campaignen_NZ
dc.typeOtheren_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages17en_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-02-16en_NZ
otago.schoolMarketingen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints261en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsMarketingen_NZ
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