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dc.contributor.authorAmoamo, Mariaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMirosa, Mirandaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTutakangahau, Hiriaen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:18:24Z
dc.date.copyright2007-06en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationAmoamo, M., Mirosa, M., & Tutakangahau, H. (2007). Maori Business Networks in Dunedin: Waiho i te toipoto, kaua i te toiroa: Let us keep close together, not far apart (Project Report). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1497en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1497
dc.description.abstractThis report is the result of a partnership and consequent research brief established between the University of Otago School of Business, Te Kupeka Umaka Maori Ki Araiteuru Inc. (KUMA), the Dunedin City Council, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu and Te Tapuae o Rehua. The brief is principally concerned with the collection and analysis of information involving the KUMA (Southern Maori) business network, its current issues and needs and its contribution to the Dunedin economy. This information is presented in the context of published work about Maori enterprise activities in general; including the 2006 Hui Taumata initiative, Accelerating Maori Economic Development. Information was collected from nineteen Dunedin-based businesses in the KUMA network, using Kaupapa Maori principles that included face-to-face interviews. The interviews were tape recorded and then transcribed in ordinary English spelling for ease of reference. Over 20 hours of data was collected in this way. Apart from providing details about the businesses themselves, project findings focus on core issues and themes that are pertinent to successful business growth and development for network members. Key findings include: - The Hui Taumata call to develop people and enterprise for Maori business growth is emerging under the KUMA umbrella. Considerable social capital is evident in the network, but the connection between this capital and the development of Maori assets is an issue that requires significant attention. - KUMA is a young and forward-looking network that has potential to offer regional and national leadership in assisting with the development of Maori business activities. - Time, staffing and compliance issues were identified as the major barriers to current business development - Areas of business weakness that could benefit from professional development activities in the network include research development, marketing, management practices and administration. - The realisation that Maori must accept responsibility for their own actions is a key driving force behind the outcomes of Hui Taumata 2005. The project findings indicate that collective aspiration and the concept of ‘rangatiratanga’ (self-determination) are key motivating elements for launching Maori business start-ups. - Maori network membership is desirable because of the long term commitment to ‘whanaungatanga’ (kinship), rather than for reasons of financial gain. - The ability to network and to create successful businesses is not only about business success but also about the growing esteem and mana of a group of people who are clearly taking charge of their lives. In order to ensure that the KUMA network can be strengthened and developed for both local and national benefit, the following actions are recommended: - Mechanisms are explored to develop and strengthen the KUMA network, including financial support. - The KUMA network reviews its activities in line with members’ suggestions. - Appropriate encouragement and support is provided for senior Maori students to undertake further research in this field. - Executive education opportunities are explored through ongoing dialogue between the School of Business and project partners. - Funding for regional and national studies of other Maori networks is pursued in order to provide a more comprehensive profile of business values, needs and support mechanisms. - Long-term planning for the future global development of Maori businesses is explored between project partners. - The processes developed to generate this project are continued.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.subjectKUMA networken_NZ
dc.subjecteducation opportunitiesen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori networksen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori businessesen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori assetsen_NZ
dc.subjectnational leadershipen_NZ
dc.subjectprofessional developmenten_NZ
dc.subjectHui Taumata 2005en_NZ
dc.subjectwhanaungatangaen_NZ
dc.subjectmana,en_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF Commerceen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF5601 Accountingen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshLC5201 Education extension. Adult education. Continuing educationen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshH Social Sciences (General)en_NZ
dc.subject.lcshL Education (General)en_NZ
dc.titleMaori Business Networks in Dunedin: Waiho i te toipoto, kaua i te toiroa: Let us keep close together, not far aparten_NZ
dc.typeProject Reporten_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages56en_NZ
otago.date.accession2007-07-05en_NZ
otago.schoolSchool of Businessen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints711en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsOffice of the Deanen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsExecutive Educationen_NZ
dc.description.referencesAlexander, W.R.J, Bell, J.D. and Knowles, S. (2005). Quantifying Compliance Costs of Small Businesses in New Zealand. New Zealand Economic Papers, 39 (1). 37-50. Broughton, P., Ruwhiu, D., & Wilson, A. (2006). Business Partnership between Maori and Non-Maori Business: Unpublished Report. Clydesdale, G. (2007). Cultural evolution and economic growth: New Zealand Maori. Entrepreneurship & Regional Development 19 (1): 49- 68. Dunedin City Council. (2006). Revised 10 Year economic development strategy to 2010 for Dunedin City. Economic Development Unit: Dunedin City Council. Durie, M. H., Fitzgerald, E., Kingi, Te K., McKinley S., Stevenson B. (2002). Maori specific outcomes and indicators: a report prepared for Te Puni Kokiri and the Ministry of Maori Development. Palmerston North: Massey University. Geertz, C., (1973). The Interpretation of Cultures: Selected Essays. Basic Books. Gifford, A. (2005). Hui Taumata 2005: a response to the draft stimulus papers. Glazer, B., & Strauss, A. (1967). The discovery of grounded theory. Chicago: Aldine. Hui Taumata Action. (2006). Hui Taumata: accelerating Maori economic development: project introductions and overviews. Jackson, M. (1988). The Maori and the criminal justice system: He whaipainga hou - a new perspective (Part 2). Wellington, New Zealand: Department of Justice, Policy and Research Division. Karena, S. (2006). KUMA website evaluation report. Keller G. (2005). Statistics for management and economics. (7th Ed.). Belmont, USA: Duxbury. KUMA. (2006). Southern Maori Business Network: Marketing Plan (first draft). Marsden, M. (2003). The woven universe: selected readings of Rev. Maori Marsden. Otaki, New Zealand, C.A. Royal. The Estate of Rev. Maori Marsden. Mead, H., Stevens, S., Third, J., Jackson, B., & Pfeifer, D. (2006). Scoping Paper: Maori leadership in Governance. Hui Taumata Action. NZIER (2003). Maori Economic Development: Te Ohanga Whanaketanga. Wellington, New Zealand Institute of Economic Research. NZIER (2005). Maori Business and Economic Performance: A summary report. Wellington, New Zealand Institute of Economic Research. Polson Higgs. (2005). Te Kupeka Umaka Maori ki Araiteuru. Business Plan. Te Puni Kokiri. (2006) Otago/Southland Client Profile. Business Development Directorate: Wellington, Te Puni Kokiri. Te Puni Kokiri. (2005). Proposal for Maori business network 2005. Confidential Report. Tuhiwai Smith, L. (2000). Kaupapa Maori Research: Reclaiming Indigenous Voice and Vision. M. Battiste. Vancouver, UBC Press: 225-247. Tuhiwai Smith, L. (2005). On Tricky Ground Researching the Native in the Age of Uncertainty. The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd Ed). D. N. K. and Y. S. Lincoln. Thousand Oaks CA, Sage. 7.2 Websites Hui Taumata website. (2005). Accessed April-June 2007 from http://www.huitaumata.maori.nz/ Hui Taumata. (2005). Summary Report. Access 17/05/07 from http://www.huitaumata.maori.nz/pdf/summary-report.pdf Te Kupeka Umaka Maori ki Araiteuru. (2007). About us. Accessed April-June 2007 from http://www.kuma.co.nz/ Wilson, M., & Deane, K.R. (2000). E-business and SMEs in the Otago region of New Zealand). Accessed 07/05/07 from http://ausweb.scu.edu.au/aw01/papers/refereed/deans/paper.html Statistics NZ. (2007). Quick stats about Maori. Accessed 29/04/07 from http://www.stats.govt.nz/census/2006-census-data/quickstatsabout-maori/2006-census-quickstats-about-maorirevised.htm?page=para017Masteren_NZ
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