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dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Rosalind Hen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorVan Vugt, Oliviaen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:22:49Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWhiting, R. H., & Van Vugt, O. (2006). Effect of gender, family structure and firm affiliation, on career promotion in auditing (Accountancy Working Paper Series No. 01_03/06). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1570en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1570
dc.descriptionNot to be quoted without the permission of the corresponding authoren_NZ
dc.description.abstractAn experimental survey design was used to test for the effect of gender and family structure of applicant, and firm affiliation of decision maker, in the decision to promote an audit senior to manager. Two hundred and ninety nine New Zealand Chartered Accountants working in auditing at the manager level or above completed the task. Family structures investigated were unmarried, “traditional” family with two children, and dual career couple with two children, and firm affiliation was considered in terms of ‘Big Four’ or non-‘Big Four’ firms. The results found no effect of gender alone, but there were some differential effects on the likelihood of career promotion with parenthood and family structure. Married men with children were more likely to be promoted to audit manager than comparable female auditors, but if these men were in dual career marriages than they were less likely to be promoted than other married male auditors with children. A dual career structure made no difference to promotion prospects for mothers. Some surprising results were found when investigating the effect of firm affiliation. Decision makers from ‘Big Four’ firms showed significantly higher promotion likelihood ratings for female auditors than those not affiliated to the ‘Big Four’. In addition, they rated females’ promotion prospects more highly than those of comparable males. This interesting result may be due to gender awareness and work/life balance policies introduced recently into ‘Big Four’ firms.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAccountancy Working Paper Seriesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.business.otago.ac.nz/acty/research/pdf/01_03_06%20Rosalind%20Whiting%20&%20Olivia%20Van%20Hugt.pdfen_NZ
dc.subjectauditingen_NZ
dc.subjectfamilyen_NZ
dc.subjectBig Fouren_NZ
dc.subjectpromotionen_NZ
dc.subjectCareeren_NZ
dc.subjectGenderen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF5601 Accountingen_NZ
dc.titleEffect of gender, family structure and firm affiliation, on career promotion in auditingen_NZ
dc.typeWorking Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages24en_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-05-31en_NZ
otago.schoolAccountancy and Business Lawen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints312en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsAccountancy & Business Lawen_NZ
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