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dc.contributor.authorWynn-Williams, Kateen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Rosalind Hen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAdler, Ralph Wen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:23:01Z
dc.date.copyright2005-09en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWynn-Williams, K., Whiting, R. H., & Adler, R. W. (2005). Student-led and teacher-led case presentations: further empirical evidence (Accountancy Working Paper Series). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1607en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1607
dc.description.abstractThe use of business case studies has been frequently promoted as a method for developing accounting graduates who are active, interdependent, and independent learners. The debate continues over the best method for using the case study method; should case studies be student- or teacher-led? A recent study (Adler, Whiting and Wynn-Williams, 2004) used Kolb’s Learning-Style Inventory (adapted from Honey and Mumford (1986) and Kolb (1984)) to investigate the use of business case studies and student learning styles in an intermediate-level cost and management accounting course. The findings from that study suggest that it is how the case studies are used and the level of student involvement that is of vital importance. This paper extends the findings of Adler et al (2004) by repeating the survey but with the following potentially important changes: prior to the survey, students had completed an entire semester of intermediate-level courses, including two accounting courses, plus the surveys were administered at a later point in the particular management accounting paper. The results of the second survey confirm and extend those of the first (Adler et al, 2004), namely, that a lack of active involvement in cases results in less balanced learning styles. Further, even when students have experienced the benefits of active participation, a prolonged suspension of such involvement also leads to an exaggerated lack of balance. That is, not only is the how of case involvement important, so is the when. That the students in the current survey had exposure to both more intermediate courses and to more business cases, regardless of level of involvement, had no discernible effect.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAccountancy Working Paper Seriesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.business.otago.ac.nz/acty/research/pdf/Wynn-williams%20et%20al.pdfen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF5601 Accountingen_NZ
dc.titleStudent-led and teacher-led case presentations: further empirical evidenceen_NZ
dc.typeWorking Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages25en_NZ
otago.date.accession2005-12-02en_NZ
otago.schoolAccountancy and Business Lawen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints10en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsAccountancy & Business Lawen_NZ
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