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dc.contributor.authorElkin, Grahamen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorŠtrach, Pavelen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:23:02Z
dc.date.copyright2006-02en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationElkin, G., & Štrach, P. (2006). Lessons from the indigenous east for western organisations? Mechanistic and organic approaches to organization and management (Working Paper No. 06/02). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1609en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1609
dc.description.abstractThere are two common sets of underlying assumptions about organizations and their management - Mechanistic and Organic. The mechanistic paradigm has led to the adoption of a scientific rationality which makes whole human beings marginal to an enterprise, and regards people as interchangeable, replaceable parts of a structured system. This implies the treatment of employees as less than fully human, in terms of skills and the full extent of mind, body and spirit. The reduction of employees to roles and tasks may affect not only their working life but mental wellness and perception of personal fulfillment. This paper argues for the adoption of an organic view of organizations focused on complete human beings at work. It sees organizations as existing through networks of whole people in relationship with one another. The indigenous evidence presented here suggests the adoption of the organic paradigm has been more common in less industrialized settings. The turbulent world may increasingly require organic approaches in order to achieve competitive advantage.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.subjectmanagmenten_NZ
dc.subjectorganizationsen_NZ
dc.subjectmechanistic managementen_NZ
dc.subjectorganic managementen_NZ
dc.subjectmanaging employeesen_NZ
dc.subjectnetworksen_NZ
dc.subjectcompetitive advantageen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshH Social Sciences (General)en_NZ
dc.titleLessons from the indigenous east for western organisations? Mechanistic and organic approaches to organization and managementen_NZ
dc.typeWorking Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages15en_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-07-31en_NZ
otago.schoolManagementen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints339en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsManagementen_NZ
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otago.relation.number06/02en_NZ
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