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dc.contributor.advisorThompson-Fawcett, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Andrew
dc.date.available2011-05-03T01:09:30Z
dc.date.copyright2011
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, A. (2011). The Experiences of the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme and Ni-Vanuatu Temporary Workers in Te Puke, New Zealand (Thesis, Master of Planning). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1680en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1680
dc.description.abstractTemporary international migration for the purpose of work has become increasingly prominent the world over. As these movements proliferate, so too does the regulation of such movement through the implementation of temporary migration programmes. However, regulation and policy flaws have been criticised as being inherent within temporary migration programmes. Consequently, this causes numerous issues from social exclusion to citizenship acquisition. Current scholars commonly note that temporary migration programmes fail because they do not allow temporary migrant workers the opportunity of upgrading into permanent residency. This research focuses on the implementation of the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme in New Zealand, a temporary worker programme, and the most ambitious ever implemented in New Zealand. The research assesses the efficacy of the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme with a focus on the experiences of temporary workers from Vanuatu within the context of Te Puke, New Zealand. The research found that the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme is working well. The research often reflected previous research and found similar issues. It found minor issues with the implementation of the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme on a day to day basis. But more significantly it found issues centred on the regulation and procedural difficulties that can, at times, render the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme as inefficient and ineffective. However, the most alarming results are the challenges and changes that the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme is likely to face within the next few years. Consequently, the research provides a number of recommendations, largely directed at the New Zealand government. The most pertinent invites the New Zealand government to consider the implementation of a points system within the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme that would include a well designed mechanism allowing for limited and conditional upgrading into permanent residency. This would enable the New Zealand government to withstand pressures for permanent residency, while providing opportunities to Pacific Islands, and contributing positively to New Zealand‘s economy.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectVanuatu
dc.subjectRecognised Seasonal Employer
dc.titleThe Experiences of the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme and Ni-Vanuatu Temporary Workers in Te Puke, New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2011-05-03T00:55:58Z
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Planning
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
otago.openaccessOpen
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