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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Lisa
dc.contributor.advisorPratt, Keryn
dc.contributor.authorBerg, David
dc.date.available2011-05-05T23:54:57Z
dc.date.copyright2011
dc.identifier.citationBerg, D. (2011). An international comparative study of the teacher efficacy beliefs and concerns about teaching of preservice teachers in Malaysia, New Zealand, and England (Thesis, Doctor of Education). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1691en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1691
dc.description.abstractThis study compares the teacher efficacy beliefs and concerns about teaching reported by preservice teachers from Malaysia (n = 53), New Zealand (n = 100), and England (n = 119). Furthermore, it examines the validity of the constructs of teacher efficacy and teachers’ concerns about teaching in these varying contexts. Evidence was gathered from preservice teachers at the beginning of the second year of their teaching degree programmes, when they completed the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy (long form) (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001) and the Concerns About Teaching Scale (Smith, Corkery, & Buckley, 2009). Focus groups completed the data. The main finding was that both culture and context appear to be significant in regard to preservice teachers’ concerns about teaching and their teacher efficacy beliefs. Teacher efficacy beliefs are a teacher’s beliefs about his or her own ability to bring about student engagement and success in both motivated and less motivated students (Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2001). These beliefs have been found to be associated with a wide range of positive outcomes for students, schools, teachers, and preservice teachers (Tschannen-Moran, Hoy & Hoy, 1998). Related to the issue of teacher efficacy are a teacher’s concerns about teaching (Malmberg & Hagger, 2009; Smith et al. 2009). Much of the existing research into teacher efficacy and teacher concerns has been conducted in Western countries, most notably in the United States. Research in other contexts is important if these constructs are to be applied internationally. A mixed methods approach was taken, collecting both quantitative and qualitative data. Following Morgan (2007), this approach was underpinned philosophically by pragmatism. The main finding was that cohort membership (Malaysia, New Zealand, and England) accounted for significant differences in the reported teacher efficacy beliefs and concerns of the preservice teachers. This difference was most evident in the comparatively low efficacy beliefs reported for both classroom management and student engagement on the part of the Malaysian preservice teachers. Explorations during the focus group discussions enabled the Malaysian preservice teachers to explain these phenomena. They expressed concerns about teaching class sizes of 50 primary students; having limited contact with classes (primary teachers in Malaysia are subject-based rather than class-based); and dealing with high parental expectations of student success. This study provides evidence of differences, such as those outlined previously, in the teacher efficacy beliefs of preservice teachers, especially in respect of Malaysia when compared with New Zealand and England. At the same time, research also suggests that preservice teachers in each of these contexts share many of the same concerns and beliefs. Furthermore, it found the constructs of teacher efficacy and teachers’ concerns about teaching equally valuable in the exploration of how members of each of these groups perceived themselves.
dc.language.isoen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
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dc.subjectteacher efficacy
dc.subjectteacher concerns
dc.titleAn international comparative study of the teacher efficacy beliefs and concerns about teaching of preservice teachers in Malaysia, New Zealand, and England
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2011-05-05T02:07:54Z
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Education
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Educationen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral Theses
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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