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dc.contributor.advisorWhitehead, Lisa
dc.contributor.advisorBurrell, Beverley
dc.contributor.authorBloomer, Helen Margaret Parnell
dc.date.available2011-05-11T03:27:12Z
dc.date.copyright2010
dc.identifier.citationBloomer, H. M. P. (2010). The Canterbury and West Coast District Health Boards’ Professional Development and Recognition Programme for Nurses: A Comparative Study of Participants and Non Participants (Thesis, Master of Health Sciences). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1697en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1697
dc.description.abstractBackground: In response to recruitment and retention issues, professional development recognition programmes for nurses have become widespread internationally. In addition, in New Zealand the introduction of the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act (2003) with subsequent competency based practising certificates for nurses, and the signing of the Multi Employer Collective Agreement (NZNO, 2004) resulted in the mandatory introduction of professional development recognition programmes within District Health Boards. However, little research exists to demonstrate who is participating in these programmes and what the motivating factors and barriers to participation are. Objectives: The purpose of this research was to identify the demographic characteristics of both participants and non-participants in the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) and West Coast District Health Board (WCDHB) Professional Development and Recognition Programme (PDRP) and to explore the motivating factors and barriers to participation in this programme through the use of the Perceived Value of Certification Tool© (PVCT). Method: Female registered nurses permanently employed by the CDHB, who were eligible to voluntarily participate in the PDRP were randomly selected to anonymously complete two written questionnaires. The first questionnaire sought demographic information while the second was the Perceived Value of Certification Tool (PVCT©). Over a one month period 399 questionnaires were sent out with 245 usable returns received. Results: No significant demographic differences between programme participants and non participants were found. However, participants in the PDRP had higher levels of agreement with the value statements which comprised the PVCT than did non-participants. Value statements related to intrinsic motivation rated more highly than those related to extrinsic motivation for both PDRP participants and non participants, suggesting that the desire to participate in the programme is largely internally motivated. Exceptions were the motivation of increased pay, and exemption from Nursing Council of New Zealand audit. Barriers to participation are primarily related to the process itself, with unwieldiness and the time required to complete a submission often cited as reasons for non participation. Conclusion: Registered Nurse participants in the programme represent a cross section of the CDHB nursing workforce. Participation in the programme appears to be internally motivated and non participation appears to be largely related to the perception that the submission process is onerous, therefore, future education and development aimed at increasing uptake of the programme needs to address these issues. It would seem that simplifying the submission process, and the evidence required would be the single most effective method of increasing participation in the programme.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectnursingen_NZ
dc.subjectPDRPen_NZ
dc.subjectprofessional developmenten_NZ
dc.subjectrecognitionen_NZ
dc.subjectCanterbury District Health Boarden_NZ
dc.subjectWest Coast District Health Boarden_NZ
dc.titleThe Canterbury and West Coast District Health Boards' Professional Development and Recognition Programme for Nurses: A Comparative Study of Participants and Non Participantsen_NZ
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2011-05-11T01:34:11Z
thesis.degree.disciplineCentre for Postgraduate Nursing Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Sciencesen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
otago.openaccessOpen
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