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dc.contributor.advisorLeach, Helen
dc.contributor.authorMartin, David Roberten_NZ
dc.date.available2009-11-16T02:22:31Z
dc.date.copyright1997
dc.identifierhttp://adt.otago.ac.nz/public/adt-NZDU20070530.145017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationMartin, D. R. (1997). The Māori Whare after contact (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/179en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/179
dc.description.abstractThis study explores post-contact changes to the ordinary Māori whare. The main physical characteristics of the ordinary whare at contact are identified by accessing archaeological and written 18th century ethnographic data. Changes in the ordinary whare in the period from contact to 1940 are discussed. Evidence from historical archaeology, written 19th century ethnographic accounts and from previous academic research is considered. In addition, changes in the ordinary whare are highlighted, based on evidence from an empirical survey of whare depicted in sketches, paintings, engravings and photographs. Rigorous statistical analysis was beyound the scope of a Master's thesis, however trends in the data are presented. A range of these are reproduced illustrating the text. After changing gradually for 130 years, the ordinary Māori whare appears to have been widely replaced by European-style houses in the early decades of the 20th century. In Aotearoa/New Zealand in the 1990s, it is apparent that Māori culture has survived the 220 or so years since contact. These years entailed increasing contact between Māori and European. In mid 20th century academic studies of Māori communities, European-style houses were found to have been used in line with continuing Māori conceptions. This evidence indicates that traditional ideas were transferred to European-style houses. The gradual changes in the whare prior to the 20th century indicate that it was a conservative social construction of space conforming to expectations about vernacular architecture generally. But the process by which Māori culture was maintained and reproduced was complicated that further study of Māori conceptions of space within the home is required.en_NZ
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightshttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.html
dc.subjectMaorien_NZ
dc.subjectdwellingsen_NZ
dc.subjectarchitectureen_NZ
dc.subjecthousingen_NZ
dc.subjecthistoryen_NZ
dc.titleThe Māori Whare after contacten_NZ
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Anthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
otago.interloanyes
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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