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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Ross
dc.contributor.advisorFisher, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorTing, Steven Tze Ching
dc.date.available2011-07-31T21:10:58Z
dc.date.copyright2011
dc.identifier.citationTing, S. T. C. (2011). The Narrative Structure of Science Documentaries (Thesis, Master of Science Communication). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1803en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1803
dc.description.abstractThe construction of a narrative that focuses on science and science communication lead me to critically explore science documentaries in an effort to see if there were common trends within the narrative structures. The result: The Narrative Structure of Science Documentaries is conceptual model that contains four principle modes of narrative structure (The Biographical, Experimental, Speculative and Evidential) inherent to science documentaries. Each mode deals with a particular aspect of how science is represented on screen and attempts to analyse their value to science communication. Because of the complexity and multifaceted nature of science, the modes featured in this study are not to be viewed as mutually exclusive to each other, but are free to interact and combine to create dynamic narratives that aim to inform, educate and entertain a largely scientific illiterate audience.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectScience Communcation
dc.subjectScience Documentaries
dc.subjectCinema
dc.subjectTelevision
dc.subjectNarrative
dc.subjectScience
dc.titleThe Narrative Structure of Science Documentaries
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2011-07-31T10:06:15Z
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Science Communication
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Science Communicationen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science Communication
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.supplementaryuploadYes
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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