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dc.contributor.advisorBoyes, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorThompson, Shona
dc.contributor.authorMaxted, John Robert
dc.date.available2011-11-16T21:40:05Z
dc.date.copyright2011
dc.identifier.citationMaxted, J. R. (2011). Boys go bush: Lived solo experiences at Tihoi Venture School (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1985en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/1985
dc.description.abstractBoys Go Bush elucidates the lived experiences of adolescent males encountering a two-day, two-night solitary experience (solo) in the New Zealand bush. A hermeneutic phenomenological inquiry framework (van Manen, 1997) was utilised to capture the essential qualities of the solo ‘as lived’, guided by the question: “what is the meaning and significance of the forty-four hour solo as experienced by students at Tihoi Venture School?” Pre-understandings to the Tihoi solo were acknowledged via an ethnographic socio-historical chapter before nine ‘lived’ solo experiences were scrutinised by means of pre- and post- interviews, underpinned by ‘44-hour solo timeline’ experience sampling records. Of relevance was what soloists did, felt, and thought about during solo and the meanings their lived-experiences came to represent. Solo interviews proved methodologically and pedagogically significant, with the solo timeline providing a low- tech experience sampling method (ESM). The analysis of written work arising from solo, including poetry, journal entries, letters to family and friends, and letters to ‘self’, provided further insight to individual experiences. Thematic statements and linguistic representations emerged from the nine solo experiences, speaking to the complex and dynamic qualities of each solo as a unique multi-dimensional experience. The lived solo experiences represented dimensions of positive and negative solitude (Long, Seburn, Averill, & More, 2003). Moments of sadness, loneliness, depression, and anxiety accompanied lived experiences of stress, tension, and fear. Darkness and the sounds of the bush at night accentuated soloist’ anxieties related to stranger danger and aspects of the unknown or supernatural. Moments of lived freedom, contentment, pleasure, boredom, and enjoyment paradoxically emerged during daylight hours when soloists were more active in body, mind, or spirit. Solo experiences were further scrutinised using a ‘solo lifeworld inquiry matrix’ oriented around the four lifeworld existentials of ‘lived time’, ‘lived space’, ‘lived relation’, and ‘lived other’ (van Manen, 1997). An interpretive synthesis revealed a complexity of essential qualities integral to the solo experience, with five plausible insights emerging of pedagogical significance to adventure education. While soloists had interest and engagement with the solo environs, the emphasis upon programme reflection and the energy spent coping with apprehension and uncertainty inhibited the deepening of nature relationship. Nights were laced with anxiety and fear for most, whilst the days provided insightful reflective space and complexities associated with boredom that paradoxically led to personal insight. The adolescent solo was deemed to be an adventure that was inclusive of the classic perceptions of risk and uncertainty as well as educational opportunity, insight, embodied aesthetic experience, playful activity, and fun. Boys Go Bush deepens understandings of the overnight solo for adolescents, highlighting a different experience from the spiritually-rewarding and deeply insightful moments promoted in the solitude literature for adults. Solo for adolescents was a challenging personal time that was endured more-so than enjoyed.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectSolo
dc.subjectSolitude
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectWilderness
dc.subjectBush
dc.subjectOutdoor Adventure Education
dc.subjectHermeneutic Phenomenology
dc.titleBoys go bush: Lived solo experiences at Tihoi Venture School
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2011-11-16T20:25:37Z
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysical Education
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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