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dc.contributor.advisorO'Kane, Paula
dc.contributor.authorHoek, Janneke
dc.date.available2012-04-02T21:03:15Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationHoek, J. (2012). Publishing Personal Information Online (Thesis, Master of Business). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2172en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2172
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined the use of Social Networking Sites (SNSs) in selection procedures. Using qualitative research methods, 15 participants with involvement in selection were interviewed. These were aimed at distinguishing how employers access, observe and utilise data from SNSs in their selection procedures, as well as investigating employers’ perceptions of privacy and discrimination. Each participant also deconstructed four Facebook profiles to provide an insight into what employers observe and the interpretation they make about the user. Of the 15 participants, nine admitted accessing SNS profiles but only two suggested these formed part of the official selection process; one conducted internet screening as part of the process and the other sought candidate permission before accessing their profile. The other seven covertly researched the candidates’ profiles. Whether official or unofficial the study sought to understand the value of this research to employers. Facebook and LinkedIn were most prominently used, accessed through Google and the employer’s personal SNS account. Facebook was used to understand person-organisation fit and soft skill, while LinkedIn was used to distinguish professional attributes. In relation to the deconstruction of the Facebook profiles, there was consensus and accuracy regarding the personality and attributes of the volunteers providing evidence of the validly of SNS screening. But, when questioned about this, interviewees suggested that: (1) SNS, and in particular Facebook, profiles were not always indicative of the person; and, (2) there was disagreement about whether a candidate’s personal life reflected their work persona. Therefore this raises questions about why organisations actually utilise SNS and what valuable information they gleam. Employers concerns relating to privacy tended to surround the legality of the access as opposed to the ethical considerations of utilising an unofficial selection tool. Although some were cognisant of potential discrimination issues associated with recognising, for example, age, gender and ethnicity, others were of the view that this would eventually emerge within other parts of the selection process and is therefore was not an issue solely associated with SNSs, rather with the integrity of the selectors and the process. Results emphasise the importance of further research and education in the subject area of SNSs in selection.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectOnline Social Networking
dc.subjectFacebook
dc.subjectRecruitment
dc.subjectSelection
dc.subjectLinkedIn
dc.subjectWeb 2.0
dc.titlePublishing Personal Information Online
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-04-02T06:32:51Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Business
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
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