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dc.contributor.advisorMaybee, Patricia
dc.contributor.advisorRitchie, Lorraine
dc.contributor.advisorBurrell, Beverley
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Gillian
dc.date.available2012-07-15T21:05:11Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationCurrie, G. (2012). The Experience of Primary Healthcare patients who take Warfarin in New Zealand (Thesis, Master of Health Sciences). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2354en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2354
dc.description.abstractBackground: Warfarin therapy is an integral component of Primary Healthcare and is considered underutilised. Primary Healthcare nurses are predominantly involved with long-term monitoring and collaborative management of Warfarin therapy. This research emanated from the paucity of qualitative research on patients’ own experience. The aims of this study were to explore Primary Healthcare patients’ experience of initiation, monitoring and education of Warfarin. To explore patients’ beliefs, issues, concerns and behaviours regarding Warfarin, as well as exploring patients’ understanding of their relationships with Primary healthcare professionals. Methodology: The sample included four males and six females: eight who identified as New Zealand European and two New Zealand Māori. Ages ranged from forty-two to eighty-six years. Warfarin had been prescribed between six months to twenty-eight years. A qualitative inductive methodology adapted from Thomas’ (2003) framework was utilised to enable the participant’s experience and a deeper understanding to be illuminated. An inductive method enabled a straightforward, comprehensible and orderly procedure for data analysis, allowing an emergence, identification and interpretation of themes without confinement. The researcher used reflection to reduce bias and recognise the influence of prior experience to permit a true reflection of the participant’s perspective. Results: Inductive data analysis revealed six key interrelated themes. These themes were impact, self, knowledge acquisition, information/misinformation, education and health professionals. Conclusion: Warfarin therapy encroaches significantly into patients’ lives. Repercussions of Warfarin therapy are evident in many facets of life, not just health. Individual variance requires integration into practice of personality, differing learning styles and diversity of cultural health perspectives. Primary care was valued as it provided trust, continuity of care, empowerment and ease of access. Nurses make positive contributions to patients on Warfarin; however, there is a possibility of role development. This is the first New Zealand qualitative study to highlight patients’ experience of Warfarin therapy in Primary Care.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectWarfarin
dc.subjectPrimary Healthcare
dc.subjectPatients experience of Warfarin
dc.titleThe Experience of Primary Healthcare patients who take Warfarin in New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-07-15T10:14:56Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineCentre for Postgraduate Nursing Studies
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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