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dc.contributor.advisorMann, Jim
dc.contributor.advisorVenn, Bernard
dc.contributor.authorKataoka, Minako
dc.date.available2012-09-14T01:21:29Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationKataoka, M. (2012). Glycaemic response and glycaemic index to five varieties of rice in people of European and Chinese ethnicity (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2453en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2453
dc.description.abstractGlycaemic Index (GI) may be used to guide choice of carbohydrate containing foods. GI has typically been determined in small groups of European volunteers and the value thus obtained is assumed to apply to all populations. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are ethnic differences in glycaemic responses and GI to various varieties of rice in people of European and Chinese ethnicity. Sixty-two healthy volunteers, 31 Chinese and 31 Europeans (18-50yr) consumed 50g of available carbohydrate portions on separate mornings after a 10hr overnight fast. Capillary blood glucose was measured at baseline and over a 2hr period following ingestion of foods (glucose beverage, tested two occasions, and five rice varieties: Jasmine, Basmati, Brown, Doongara® and Parboiled, each tested on a single occasion). Age, height, and sex distribution were not different between the two groups, but body weight and body mass index (BMI) were significantly lower in the Chinese than the European group (p<0.05). Incremental blood glucose areas under the curve (iAUC) of all tested foods were greater in Chinese than in Europeans (p<0.05). The largest difference was for Parboiled rice for which the Chinese iAUC was 77% (95%CI: 38, 226, p<0.001) higher than the European iAUC. In the Chinese and European groups, respectively, the GI of Doongara® (67, 55), Jasmine (81, 68), and Parboiled rice (72, 57) were significantly higher in the Chinese. The greater glycaemic response to carbohydrate in Chinese compared with Europeans and the higher glycaemic index for several rice varieties has potential clinical relevance. Regression analysis including variables which might have explained the ethnic differences suggested that age, sex, salivary alpha-amylase and extent of chewing contributed little to the ethnic difference.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectGlycaemic response
dc.subjectGlycaemic index
dc.subjectEthnicity
dc.subjectChinese
dc.subjectEuropean
dc.subjectRice
dc.titleGlycaemic response and glycaemic index to five varieties of rice in people of European and Chinese ethnicity
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-09-13T23:49:42Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Nutrition
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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