Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHenaghan, Mark
dc.contributor.advisorMcLean, Sheila
dc.contributor.authorSnelling, Jeanne Marie
dc.date.available2012-10-12T03:17:29Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationSnelling, J. M. (2012). Parental Preferences and Procreative Choices: Reproductive Liberty and the Regulation of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2489en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2489
dc.description.abstractPreimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a procedure that enables the identification of gene variants in an embryo created by in vitro fertilization. It was first developed as a means by which couples known to be at risk of transmitting serious genetic disorders to their offspring could attempt to conceive a child without that particular condition. Although first utilised to diagnose conditions such as cystic fibrosis, haemophilia or Huntington Disease—the scope of PGD has extended considerably over the years and may now be used to identify gene variants associated not only with genetic disorders, but also other gene-based characteristics or traits such as sex. States have responded to this new genetic technology in diverse ways. Such responses range from complete prohibition in some jurisdictions to more laissez faire approaches. Others, including New Zealand and the United Kingdom, have introduced initiatives that regulate, at the state level, the extent of parental choice in this context. This thesis is broadly premised on the argument that reproductive liberty constitutes a fundamental value in liberal societies regardless of the fact that it has not always been sufficiently respected, or even recognized, by law. An additional central argument is that this presumption of reproductive liberty is just as arguable in the context of assisted reproduction as it is in relation to natural reproduction. This thesis draws on liberal principles, as well as a critique of anti-liberal accounts, to ultimately suggest that a restrictive regulatory approach to PGD is problematic.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectPreimplantation genetic diagnosis
dc.subjectReproductive liberty
dc.subjectassisted reproduction
dc.subjectliberalism
dc.titleParental Preferences and Procreative Choices: Reproductive Liberty and the Regulation of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-10-12T01:28:23Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineLaw
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
 Find in your library

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item is not available in full-text via OUR Archive.

If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record