Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKieser, Jules
dc.contributor.advisorSwain, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Amanda Louise
dc.date.available2012-11-05T01:55:25Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationBradley, A. L. (2012). Child Abuse: Understanding the Biomechanics of Rib Fractures in Infants (Thesis, Master of Health Sciences). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2549en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2549
dc.description.abstractThere are some general assumptions made by forensic paediatricians and pathologists about how infants in child abuse cases suffer fractured ribs; the main assumption being that rib fractures are resultant from ‘shaken baby syndrome’. There have been many studies on the biomechanics of rib fractures in adults and the different modes through which these occur, but there has been no scientific research conducted on the biomechanics of rib fractures in infants or children. There are two main aims to this study; firstly, to assess the biomechanical properties of immature piglet ribs and compare these results with published literature on adult pig ribs and secondly, to compare and contrast the fracture patterns of immature piglet ribs in three categories: dry, frozen then thawed, and fresh. Piglet ribs were taken from still born or day-old piglets and tested in the three different categories and two different protocols for stress, strain, modulus, and maximum load measurements. Scanning Electron Microscopy and micro-CT scanning were the imaging techniques used to examine morphological differences between the three categories. It was found that the dry samples had catastrophic breaks that followed a straight and then oblique fracture pattern, whereas the fractures observed in the frozen and thawed samples were straight, incomplete fractures. Fresh samples did not fracture. Statistically significant differences were found between each of the three categories; in particular the frozen then thawed ribs produced greater biomechanical results than the fresh ribs which were expected to be similar in response. This suggests that using freezing as a storage method significantly alters the biomechanical analysis The present study seriously challenges the current dogma on shaken baby syndrome in the literature, and suggests that rib fractures do not occur during compressive loading of the rib cage in infants due to the very high plasticity and partial bony development.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectAbuse
dc.subjectBiomechanics
dc.subjectRib
dc.subjectFracture
dc.titleChild Abuse: Understanding the Biomechanics of Rib Fractures in Infants
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-11-04T21:38:21Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Oral Sciences
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record