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dc.contributor.advisorOrlovich, David
dc.contributor.advisorDickinson, Kath
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, Max
dc.date.available2012-11-14T03:02:06Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationCrowe, M. (2012). Characterisation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities associated with Hieracium lepidulum in Central Otago, New Zealand (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2606en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2606
dc.description.abstractAlien plants cost the New Zealand economy over $1 billon per annum in lost revenue and control measures, and can modify native plant communities to the detriment of endemic biodiversity. Hieracium lepidulum has invaded several regions of New Zealand and is found in high densities among the hills in Central Otago. The roles of microbes are increasingly included in theoretical models of plant invasion, and this study investigates the diversity and spatial structure of a group of ubiquitous organisms, the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), growing in symbiosis with Hieracium lepidulum. Three AMF-specific molecular primer sets were tested to determine their relative sensitivity and specificity for detecting AMF in cultures established from field collected propagules. The optimal primer set was then used to characterise the AMF community associated with H. lepidulum in modified subalpine grassland. The fungi from 30 plant individuals within a 1.8 × 1.8 m plot were characterised using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and cloning. AMF communities colonising individual plants were found to be diverse, uncorrelated with root biomass, and possess significant phylogenetic structure. Nine phylogenetically distinct taxa were defined, with no plant individual possessing more than seven taxa, despite one AMF taxon comprising over 67% of total abundances. Spatial analysis found evidence of significant positive spatial autocorrelation in the identities of AMF colonising neighbouring H. lepidulum up to 0.5 m. Spatial clustering was also detected in the distributions of H. lepidulum individuals at similar scales, potentially indicating common mechanisms structuring both host and symbiont distributions. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence data found evidence that the detected AMF taxa were potentially endemic and widespread generalists, indicating that the success of H.lepidulum as an invader is not likely to be the result of facilitation by coinvasive AMF.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectHieracium
dc.subjectHieracium lepidulum
dc.subjectGlomeromycota
dc.subjectarbuscular mycorrhiza
dc.subject18s
dc.subjectSpatial autocorrelation
dc.subjectrDNA
dc.subjectLocharburn
dc.subjectRFLP
dc.subjectAMF
dc.subjectInvasion
dc.subjectFaciliation
dc.subjectSymbiosis
dc.titleCharacterisation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities associated with Hieracium lepidulum in Central Otago, New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-11-14T01:58:59Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineBotany
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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