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dc.contributor.advisorHalberstadt, Jamin Brett
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Neville Lawson
dc.date.available2012-11-21T01:52:26Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationTodd, N. L. (2012). Is self-esteem embodied? The influence of vertical orientation on self-esteem and domain specific sociometers. (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2635en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2635
dc.description.abstractCombining sociometer theory’s assumption that self-esteem (SE) is a reflection of our relationship with the social world, and embodiment theory’s proposition that this relationship is influenced by the body, it was predicted that SE should be malleable via manipulation of the body and/or its physical relation to the world. Three studies tested whether differences in vertical spatial orientation (high versus low chair height) would influence explicit and implicit SE (Study 1), and SE related social comparisons relevant to domain specific sociometers (Studies 2-3). While effects on SE were inconclusive, participants seated in high chairs preferred higher status mates than participants in low chairs, suggesting activation of a sociometer specific to the mating domain. Possible explanations for these findings, how they compare with previous research on the embodied self-concept, and suggestions for future research are discussed.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectself-esteem
dc.subjectembodied cognition
dc.subjectsociometer
dc.subjectmate choice
dc.subjectheight
dc.subjectattraction
dc.subjectverticality
dc.subjectspatial orientation
dc.subjectpower
dc.titleIs self-esteem embodied? The influence of vertical orientation on self-esteem and domain specific sociometers.
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-11-21T01:30:11Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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