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dc.contributor.advisorBuckley, Hallie
dc.contributor.authorLabidon, Sigrid Lorraine
dc.date.available2012-11-22T20:26:33Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationLabidon, S. L. (2012). Health in the late pre-colonial and early colonial period in the Philippines (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2643en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2643
dc.description.abstractBioarchaeology, the study of skeletal remains from archaeological sites, is useful in understanding the health of past populations. Information on health of past populations is important in a holistic interpretation of the past and also helps in understanding the current health trends within a population. The use of a biocultural approach in bioarchaeology is essential in understanding the interactions between culture and biology and how it affects the way people live. In Southeast Asia, bioarchaeological studies on prehistoric health have been accomplished in recent years. This improvement in the bioarchaeological literature of Southeast Asia has provided essential information about the past life of Southeast Asians. However, these studies are mainly focused on continental Southeast Asia while studies on skeletal remains from island Southeast Asia focus on origins of current populations and paleoanthropological research. This thesis aims to address the gap in bioarchaeological literature in island Southeast Asia by examining several skeletal samples for evidence of health and disease from the pre-colonial and colonial period in the Philippines. The individuals from the Philippines were assessed for age and sex. The prevalence of skeletal and oral pathologies of the individuals from the two time periods were analyzed and compared. A summary of the archaeological and historical background of Southeast Asia and the Philippines was presented to provide a context of the samples. A review of the diseases likely to be seen in skeletal remains from the Philippines and the lesions they produce was also accomplished. The individuals from the colonial period had a higher prevalence of both skeletal and oral pathologies, suggesting a decline in health with the onset of colonialism. This result is consistent with historical evidence indicating a decline in health among Filipinos during the early colonial period. A comparison of pathologies from the pre-colonial period to similar time periods in mainland Southeast Asia indicates that the individuals from island Southeast Asia had better health and were subjected to less stress than those from the continental region. The archaeological and historical background of both regions suggests a difference in lifestyle which had most probably contributed to the difference in health status of the individuals from continental and island Southeast Asia. However, the examination of more skeletal samples is needed to further assess this difference in health among individuals from the two regions.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/x-rar-compressed
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectPhilippines
dc.subjectpaleopathology
dc.titleHealth in the late pre-colonial and early colonial period in the Philippines
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-11-22T05:41:49Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Anatomy
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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