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dc.contributor.advisorCourt, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorEmerson, Helen Katrineen_NZ
dc.date.available2012-12-14T04:40:37Z
dc.date.copyright1999en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationEmerson, H. K. (1999). A voice of her own : Ethel Smyth and early feminist musicology (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2943en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/2943
dc.descriptionviii, 180 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Music.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractThroughout her life Ethel Smyth (1858-1944) fought to be recognised as a professional composer in her own right, regardless of her gender. From an early age Smyth had an awareness of the potential difficulties facing women musicians and she experienced much prejudice throughout her career. She used her own experiences as the foundation for her feminist beliefs which she expressed in her essays on women in music and in her autobiographical writings. However, her ideas have not been acknowledged, and her views have been to some extent ridiculed and ignored. An examination of Smyth's views on women in music reveals an acute awareness of her situation as a woman in a male-dominated profession. In her writings she articulated the processes by which she felt women were excluded from the profession, and in her later writings she concluded that the expression of a "female voice" in women's music was the cause for exclusion. Furthermore, her writings anticipate a number of observations and beliefs which have become central to the discipline of feminist musicology. The first chapter examines Smyth's life and career, focusing on the experiences and conditions that helped formulate her feminist beliefs. Chapter two examines Smyth's portrayal in history and argues that her historical representation perpetuates the idea that her feminist writings are of little importance. Chapters three and four demonstrate that her essays reflected feminist beliefs of the period and represented the reality experienced by many women composers. The final chapter compares modern feminist musicology with Smyth's writings, arguing that many of her theories anticipate the central arguments of feminist musicology.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.en_NZ
dc.titleA voice of her own : Ethel Smyth and early feminist musicologyen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.voyager377634en_NZ
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