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dc.contributor.advisorWheen, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Aimee Rebeccaen_NZ
dc.date.available2012-12-14T04:48:36Z
dc.date.copyright2009en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBrown, A. R. (2009). The role of central government in resource management : less extraordinary under the Resource Management Act 1991? (Thesis, Master of Laws). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3312en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3312
dc.description164 leaves :illus., col. front., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. "22 December 2009". University of Otago department: Lawen_NZ
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the relative roles of central and local government in resource management in New Zealand over time and as they have evolved to the present day. Prior to the Resource Management Act, a fragmented and poorly integrated body of resource management legislation was implemented by a myriad of disjointed and ad hoc local government bodies, with central government playing an increasingly dominant, but mostly inconsistent role. The insufficient and disparate conventional run of resource management therefore led or allowed central government to intervene in decision-making as a means to remedy limitations, perceived problems or gaps in the law. The resource management law reform, as part of wider government restructuring sought to address these deficiencies, and an all-encompassing review led to the enactment of the Resource Management Act 1991. The Resource Management Act created an integrated planning framework, with active management responsibilities devolved to a reformed and reorganized local government. This devolution was balanced against a recognition- clearly manifest in the Act- that central government should continue to play a key role in resource management decision-making on a day-to-day basis. Thus central government "ordinary" activity was anticipated and provided for by the Act. However, this thesis argues that the pervasive failure of central government to adequately fulfil this role has undermined the aim of the Act, and impacted negatively on the quality and success of planning at the subordinate levels. Furthermore, this has enabled or forced central government to intervene in resource management decision-making in unnecessarily extraordinary ways.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.en_NZ
dc.titleThe role of central government in resource management : less extraordinary under the Resource Management Act 1991?en_NZ
dc.title.alternativeRMA and roles of central governmenten_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineLawen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Lawsen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.voyager1863915en_NZ
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