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dc.contributor.advisorMemon, Ali
dc.contributor.advisorHarris, Paul
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Bronwyn Maryen_NZ
dc.date.available2012-12-14T04:50:58Z
dc.date.copyright2000en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHayward, B. M. (2000). Beyond consensus : social learning in urban planning (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3369en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3369
dc.descriptionxv, 294 leaves :col. ill., maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geographyen_NZ
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the alms and assumptions of deliberative urban planning. It addresses the need for more vigorous debate between planning theorists interested in uncoerced communication and democratic theorists concerned with promoting greater deliberation in politics. Two models of deliberative planning theory are identified in the analysis: a model of consensus building and a model of social learning. It is argued that the model of social learning is both more persuasive as a normative theory of planning and more useful as a description of the experiences of deliberation in planning, as described in this study. Analysis of the theory of deliberative planning is supported by empirical research. Three cases of urban planning in Christchurch, New Zealand are examined. A new institutionalist research methodology is adopted to analyse the case studies. The research techniques included: participant observation, focus group discussion and key informant interviews. Empirical research identifies conditions for enhancing inclusive deliberation and social learning in urban planning. These are summarised as five conditions of social transformation in planning. Under these '5 Ts' attention is not simply paid to ways that enable new voices to speak, but also to the conditions under which those voices are heard and heeded. The conditions of social transformation include a treaty (or constitutional protections), talk plus (supplementing free and frank face to face discussion with other ways of encouraging social learning), the presence of third parties (informal and formal facilitators who encourage listening across difference), opportunities for transmission of the outcomes of deliberation and mechanisms to ensure transparency enhancing accountability in deliberation and subsequent decision-making. In conclusion discussion strengthens the theory of deliberative planning by qualification, identifying the limits of its application and considering the implications of research and theoretical discussion for urban planning practice in New Zealand.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.en_NZ
dc.titleBeyond consensus : social learning in urban planningen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_NZ
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.voyager388098en_NZ
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