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dc.contributor.advisorStenhouse, John
dc.contributor.authorChivers, Susan Lee
dc.date.available2010-06-25T01:23:59Z
dc.date.copyright1992
dc.identifier.citationChivers, S. L. (1992). Religion, ethnicity and race : the mission of the Otago Church to the Chinese 1860-1950 (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/336en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/336
dc.description.abstractThe influx of Chinese goldminers into the Otago province during the 1860s presented a challenge to the European church, in that the opportunity for evangelistic outreach could not be ignored. Moreover, as the "heathen Chinee" allegedly posed a threat to religious and social mores, conversion to Christianity appeared to be the best means of combatting this danger. This thesis seeks to explore the struggle between religion, ethnicity and race: the conflict between Christianity, with its associated social values, and traditional Chinese culture. It examines the nature of the Chinese experience in New Zealand, particularly with regard to public and parliamentary hostility. Against this background, the efforts of various denominations to confront the Chinese challenge are investigated. As the Presbyterian Church and their missionary, Reverend Alexander Don, were at the forefront of their Mission, their contribution is the main focus. A formidable number of obstacles, posed largely by Chinese culture, severely hindered the effectiveness of evangelistic outreach. I examine these obstacles, as well as the charge that Don was a racist. The answer to the latter is a qualified one. While not without his prejudices, the missionary gradually learned to appreciate many aspects of Chinese culture. He also criticised the racism prevailing within European society, tirelessly defending Chinese rights. In return "Teacher Don" earned more trust and respect for New Zealand's Chinese community than almost any other European of his time. Although in terms of his own evangelistic aims the Mission might be judged a failure, as few Chinese were converted, in terms of this wider perspective Don's efforts proved to be more successful.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightshttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.html
dc.subjectDon, Alexander, 1857-1934en_NZ
dc.subjectMissionaries New Zealand Biographyen_NZ
dc.subjectChinese New Zealand Otago Historyen_NZ
dc.subjectGold miners New Zealand Otago Historyen_NZ
dc.subjectChinese Missions New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectRace relations Religious aspectsen_NZ
dc.subjectChinese New Zealand Otago Social conditionsen_NZ
dc.subjectOtago (N.Z.) Race relationsen_NZ
dc.titleReligion, ethnicity and race : the mission of the Otago Church to the Chinese 1860-1950en_NZ
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2010-06-25T00:55:18Z
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
otago.openaccessOpen
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