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dc.contributor.authorBaskerville, Rachel Francisen_NZ
dc.date.available2012-12-14T04:51:06Z
dc.date.copyright1988en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBaskerville, R. F. (1988). Pelvic dimensions : an account of studies of the pelvis 1885-1988 (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3374en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3374
dc.descriptionxiv, 343 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Anthropology.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is an historical/analytical account of the ways in which the pelvis has been studied. The starting point is Turner's 1885 study in which the pelvis was used as a 'thing' to demonstrate racial progressionism. The thesis continues with a detailed account of the systems of classifying pelves in obstetric studies; and studies of racial and sex differences in the pelvis as undertaken in physical anthropology. The second part looks at the ways ideas developed from these studies were used in the formation and appeal of 'The Reproductive Dilemma' and the use of the pelvis in theories about bipedalism and human evolution. The importance of the 'Reproductive Dilemma' in theories of human evolution can be attributed to the appealing imagery with strong narrative elements, which appear to mirror nineteenth-century theories about the recapitulation of phylogeny in ontogeny. The discussion on neoteny and retardation considers whether or not Bolk's inclusion of the pelvic form as a neotenous trait was confusing, as more recent authors have suggested. In combining data from studies of hormones, diet and other determinants of pelvic form, it can be seen that the ideas of sex differences in pelvic bones are based more on nineteenth century social concepts of gender functions, rather than any demonstrable biological selection for parturition in the female pelvis. An examination of the way in which the pelvis of Homo. s. neanderthalensis has been studied is a good illustration of this. A second illustration of the argument is a study undertaken on a small sample (29) pelves from a collection of New Zealand prehistoric material.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.en_NZ
dc.titlePelvic dimensions : an account of studies of the pelvis 1885-1988en_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_NZ
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.voyager346826en_NZ
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