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dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Albert
dc.contributor.authorEaton, Margaret Roseen_NZ
dc.date.available2012-12-14T04:58:23Z
dc.date.copyright1994en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationEaton, M. R. (1994). Word-pairs & continuity in translation in the ancient Near East (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3598en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3598
dc.description354 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Religious Studiesen_NZ
dc.description.abstractIt has been recognised for more than two hundred years that the basic style of poetry in the Hebrew Bible is parallelism, and its system has been minutely studied. More recently ethnographers have noted the same style in numerous ancient and traditional languages. Within the last half-century, an identical feature of parallelism has been found in classical Hebrew and one cognate language, as well as in several unrelated traditional languages. This feature, the presence of certain specific pairs of words in contiguous lines of verse, has attracted the interest of linguists, ethnographers, and biblical scholars. A concerted effort, which still continues, was started by Mitchell Dahood to collect the word pairs cognate between Ugaritic and classical Hebrew; before 1982, three volumes consisting of 1019 pairs were published as Ras Shamra Parallels. The widespread use of parallelism in traditional languages and its documented use in cognate languages before and after the heyday of classical Hebrew suggests that word pairs also are present. In order to determine to what extent, if at all, authors writing in the classical Hebrew style were aware of the nature and significance of word pairs, this study has been undertaken to assess the degree to which the translators of the Septuagint were consistent in their choice of words. Unusual consistency argues that the Seventy were aware of the special role of the specific words which form pairs. A selection of Dahood's pairs was made consisting of the words that pair with "earth" (thirty in number) and those that pair with the thirty, totalling about 220. This number, about 20% of the total, is regarded as statistically significant. A concordance programme, AnyText, developed by Linguists' Software, Inc. was used to determine the number of occurrences of each of those words in the Hebrew Bible. The same programme was then used to find and record the references where the members of each word pair appeared in close proximity. Finally, each reference was checked against the Septuagint and the Greek translation of each member of the word pair was recorded. Taken as a whole, translations were remarkably consistent. Those words which appeared many times as members of word pairs were usually translated in the same way wherever they appeared. Those which appeared in few word pairs were less consistent in translation, though the correlation was not absolute. A complex of word pairings that appeared frequently was identified and assessed for consistency of translation; those results confirmed what had already been found. It appears that the Seventy were aware in an implicit sense of the significance of word pairs.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.en_NZ
dc.titleWord-pairs & continuity in translation in the ancient Near Easten_NZ
dc.title.alternativeWord pairs and continuity in translation in the ancient Near Easten_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_NZ
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.voyager154639en_NZ
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