Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMurachver, Tamar
dc.contributor.advisorBayard, Donn
dc.contributor.authorGreen, James Allanen_NZ
dc.date.available2012-12-14T04:58:54Z
dc.date.copyright2003en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationGreen, J. A. (2003). Communication accommodation theory: understanding language use in social interaction (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3622en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3622
dc.descriptionx, 217, lxxxvi leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Psychology. "July 21, 2003".en_NZ
dc.description.abstractCommunication accommodation theory (CAT) is currently the most encompassing theory of language use in social situations. It seeks to explain not only language use, but also the social psychological processes underlying language use. At CAT’s core is three adaption strategies: convergence, maintenance, and divergence. That is, adapting toward, not adapting, or adapting away from the language used by one’s conversational partner. However, as well as describing how language changes, CAT explains why people use different strategies, and what follow-on effects use of these strategies cause. In the Chapter 2, CAT was applied to a novel communication medium — toilet graffiti. Graffiti were collected verbatim from adjacent male toilets, female toilets, and study booths. Gender differences in language styles used in male and female toilets were generally consistent with those found in other media. These differences were mitigated in the mixed-gender context (study booths), suggesting convergence of gendered language. Neither accommodation nor gendered language has been considered in adolescence, even though it has been argued that adolescence may be a key time for the development of such behaviour. In Chapter 3, 40 participants were paired in same- and mixed-gender dyads. Stronger gender differences were found in same-gender dyads, with clear evidence of partner effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that adolescents do use gendered language in similar ways to adult populations, and that they also accommodate to gendered language styles. A key untested hypothesis of CAT is that attraction or similarity should influence the amount of convergence in an interpersonal conversation. I manipulated physical attractiveness to test this hypothesis in Chapter 4, using images previously rated as high or medium attractive. 64 participants were sent randomly assigned high or medium attractive images of an opposite gender confederate netpal. Participants exchanged a series of emails with the confederate, who used either a male- or female-typical language style. As predicted, participants with a highly attractive netpal converged more than participants with a less attractive netpal. In Chapter 5, individual differences were considered in both the use of gendered language and convergence to gendered language. Higher levels of convergence were best predicted by lower self-monitoring scores, but were also related to more feminine scores for females. Gendered language was not consistently predicted by any one variable, but an overall pattern emerged. Finally, in Chapter 6, results were integrated with previous research and different theoretical perspectives. Numerous exciting possibilities for future research were also outlined. Overall, CAT was strengthened by my findings, but there is much research that can still be done.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.en_NZ
dc.titleCommunication accommodation theory: understanding language use in social interactionen_NZ
dc.title.alternativeCommunication accommodation theory.en_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_NZ
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.voyager924732en_NZ
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record