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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Ian W.G.
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Peter John
dc.date.available2012-12-19T02:59:39Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationMitchell, P. J. (2012). Tracks and Traces: an archaeological survey of railway construction related sites on the Otago Central Railway (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3641en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3641
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this thesis is the archaeology of workers’ camps associated with the Otago Central Railway. The railway was begun in 1880 and completed in 1920. Using the historical record in conjunction with remote sensing and site survey, this thesis separates sites related to the construction of the Otago Central Railway from those involved with the everyday operation and maintenance of the line. Eight sites are investigated using a two site type model to determine whether a site was a Public Works Department site or that of a private contractor. The research has shown that Public Works Department camps were situated in the most favourable locations, while those of the private contractors’ were located as near to the work at hand as possible.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectarchaeology
dc.subjectrailways
dc.subjectworkers camps
dc.titleTracks and Traces: an archaeological survey of railway construction related sites on the Otago Central Railway
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2012-12-19T02:34:12Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology and Archaeology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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