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dc.contributor.advisorGalletly, Duncan
dc.contributor.advisorLarsen, Peter
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Angela Catherine
dc.date.available2013-04-05T00:36:10Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationRobertson, A. C. (2013). Workplace First Aid in New Zealand (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3835en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3835
dc.description.abstractIn New Zealand the Department of Labour provides guidance on the provision of first-aid equipment, facilities and training to meet the requirements of the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992, and Regulations 1995. The guidelines state that employers should take all practicable steps to provide suitably qualified first-aid personnel, and outline the nature and frequency of first-aid training. In addition the Factories and Commercial Premises (First Aid) Regulations 1985 state the specific requirements for workplace first-aid provision. Systematic research on workplace first-aid policy and practice, first-aid training, equipment, and first-aid facilities had not been undertaken since the legislation and guidelines were introduced. Similarly research on the first-aiders’ role, the nature and frequency of their training, their use of workplace first-aid equipment and facilities, and their application of first-aid did not exist. Furthermore, the relevance of the first-aid training syllabus in relation to the first-aid treatment provided in the workplace had not been explored. This research explored workplace first-aid policy and practice in accordance with the legislation and guidelines, and determined how past events, circumstances, and dominant social norms had shaped this provision. The aim was to ascertain the workplaces’ requirements for first-aid, inform future workplace first-aid policy and practice in New Zealand, minimise the consequences of workplace injury and/or illness through the provision of appropriate emergency care, and contribute to the wider body of knowledge on workplace first-aid. Three research methods were used. Two exploratory qualitative surveys were conducted with a small sample of workplaces. The results informed two national surveys that included workplaces from all Industry Groups, and multiple statistical analyses were completed. Finally, historical research was undertaken from two distinct perspectives. The first investigated the introduction, development, and expansion of workplace first-aid in New Zealand between 1884 and 2005. The second traced the content and delivery of the first-aid training syllabus taught to attain certification during the same period of time. A social critical approach was used for both of the historical research strands. The results show emergency first-aid care was not available in all workplaces. Workplaces were unaware of legislative requirements, and or guidelines on first-aid provision. Traditionally, these requirements have been based on dominant social norms rather than evidence-based, and have little relevance in the workplace. Workplace first-aid policy and practice was not based on the potential exposure to risk of injury and/or illness, the availability of medical care, systematic practices, or workplace injury/illness data. First-aid training and assessment was inconsistent, infrequent, and parts of the syllabus were irrelevant. There was no evidence to suggest workplace first-aid training, equipment and facilities was based on what first-aid was applied in the workplace. New Zealand has an uncoordinated approach to workplace first-aid. The regulatory framework is complex and ineffective, and the first-aid training syllabus does not meet the needs of the present or future work environment. Recommendations for future workplace first-aid policy, practice and research were discussed.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectworkplace
dc.subjectfirst-aid
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.titleWorkplace First Aid in New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-04-04T22:20:23Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineSurgery and Anaesthesia
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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