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dc.contributor.advisorPaterson, Lachlan
dc.contributor.advisorHokowhitu, Brendan
dc.contributor.advisorReilly, Michael
dc.contributor.authorTimms, Catriona Elizabeth
dc.date.available2013-04-10T00:25:34Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationTimms, C. E. (2013). Indigenous Language Revitalisation in Aotearoa New Zealand and Alba Scotland (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/3851en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/3851
dc.description.abstractLanguage revitalisation aims to ‘reverse language shift’ (see Fishman, 1991, 2001), that is, to reverse the process of language decline. Language usage in the home and intergenerational transmission are fundamental to the achievement of language revitalisation. Language decline and revitalisation have become ‘glocal’ issues in that Indigenous communities are making global connections in order to promote local expressions of language revitalisation. This is truly a worldwide phenomenon given that it has been estimated that up to half of the world’s approximately 6000 languages will be extinct by the end of the twenty-first century (Krauss, 1992). Responses to Indigenous language decline in Aotearoa New Zealand and Alba Scotland were initially spearheaded by communities, with government support developing later due to public pressure and activism. Government efforts for language revitalisation in these two countries focus on three key areas: language policy and planning; education; and the media. Aspects of popular culture, such as print culture, performing arts and music may also attract some funding, but the focus is usually on these as an expression of national culture and identity. Community responses to language decline are varied and include language policy and planning, education, the media and popular culture as tools to promote language revitalisation. This thesis aims to undertake a sustained cross-national comparative analysis of language revitalisation practices in relation to two Indigenous languages: te reo Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand and Gàidhlig in Alba Scotland. It examines the language revitalisation strategies employed in these two countries including government and community responses to language decline. The thesis focuses on the contributions of language policy and planning, education, the media and popular culture to language revitalisation. In particular the role of popular culture will be explored, with reference to print culture, performing arts and popular music. Although these elements are often recognised in planning for language revitalisation, they can be overshadowed by the emphasis placed on education and the media. As a result, the supporting role of music, print and performing arts has not been fully explored or exploited. In particular, these activities have the potential to be alternate sites for language acquisition and use outside of formal and informal learning environments, and to provide a corpus of language resources that can be used to promote language acquisition and usage.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectlanguage revitalisation
dc.subjectIndigenous languages
dc.subjectreversing language shift
dc.subjectMāori language
dc.subjectScottish Gaelic
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectScotland
dc.subjectlanguage policy and planning
dc.subjectlanguage education
dc.subjectlanguage and the media
dc.subjectlanguage and popular culture
dc.titleIndigenous Language Revitalisation in Aotearoa New Zealand and Alba Scotland
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-04-09T23:15:17Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineTe Tumu, School of Māori, Pacific & Indigenous Studies
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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