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dc.contributor.advisorKnott, Alistair
dc.contributor.advisorRobins, Anthony
dc.contributor.advisorFranz, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorLiddle, Michael David
dc.date.available2010-09-08T23:05:32Z
dc.date.copyright2010
dc.identifier.citationLiddle, M. D. (2010). Some neuro-computational investigations into the reviewing of object-files (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/390en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/390
dc.description.abstractWhen a person attends to an object, a temporary working memory representation is created for it, specific to that individual “token” object. This differs from more general accumulated memories for “types” of objects. Kahneman, Treisman, and Gibbs (1992) conducted a series of “object-reviewing” studies showing that these token object representations are able to persist after focal attention is withdrawn from an object, and can be reactivated when the same object is reattended to shortly afterwards. Kahneman et al. (1992) used the term “object-files” to refer to these working memory representations. In the years since the publication of these seminal results many subsequent studies have further probed this type of memory. However, the question of the neural mechanisms which implement object-files is still largely an open one. In this thesis I attempt to examine these mechanisms, asking what is required computationally for such memory traces to persist and be reactivated, and how and why they might be implemented in the brain. My study has three distinct parts. Firstly, I present a computational analysis of the problem, the results of which provide number of avenues of further enquiry. Secondly, I present a neural network implementation of a mechanism, hypothesised in the previous analysis, that is able to account for results of the object-reviewing paradigm. Finally, I present the results of a series of human psychophysical experiments, investigating the relationship of object-reviewing performance with the ability to track multiple moving objects, first observed by Pylyshyn and Storm (1988). The results of these experiments would appear to have implications for the theoretical foundations of both object-reviewing and multiple object tracking research.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightshttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.html
dc.subjectcomputer-scienceen_NZ
dc.subjectpsychologyen_NZ
dc.subjectneuroscienceen_NZ
dc.subjectcognitive-scienceen_NZ
dc.subjectvisionen_NZ
dc.subjectattentionen_NZ
dc.subjectobject-based-attentionen_NZ
dc.subjectobject-filesen_NZ
dc.subjectobject-reviewingen_NZ
dc.subjectmultiple-object-trackingen_NZ
dc.subjectneural-networksen_NZ
dc.subjectcomputational-modellingen_NZ
dc.titleSome neuro-computational investigations into the reviewing of object-filesen_NZ
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2010-09-02T05:49:13Z
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral Thesesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
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